PPBF: Circle, Triangle, Elephant

CTEcoverAuthor: Kenji Oikawa
Illustrator: Mayuko Takeuchi
Publisher: Phaidon, 2017; orig.: Bunkeido Co., 2008
Age: 1-4
Themes: shapes, surprises, concept books
Opening: (see image below)CTE1.jpg

Summary: (from my library catalog) Circle, triangle … elephant!? A big book of shapes, with a bit of silliness mixed in.

CTE2Why I like this book: I love how simple this book for the very young is, yet how much gentle humor is incorporated. I have been reading a lot more board books since I started doing storytime in the bookstore where I work, and get very excited when I find a simple book with more to it. Could be my favorite so far this year!

CTE3.jpgResources/Activities: create a shape-game and have kids can shout out the shape or object you hold up, in groups of three, repeating in ever faster succession. I bet there will be lots of laughs too!

CTE4.pngFor more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

And a little good news via scbwi this morning!!! I posted the image a few weeks ago HERE

DrawThis9:17

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PPBF: Strong As a Bear

strongasabearcoverAuthor/Illustrator: Katrin Stangl
Publisher: Enchanted Lion, 2016 (Originally published in Germany in 2013 as Stark wie ein Bär.)
Age: 2-6
Themes: metaphors, concept books
Opening: *see first spread image below the endpaper image.
Summary: (from my library catalog) A series of children show how they are free as a bird, quick as a hare, mischievous as a monkey, quiet as a mouse, and strong as a bear.

StrongAsABearendpaper.jpgWhy I like this book: I actually liked this so much more at the second look – as with too many things, we move too fast and don’t savour the journey, but kids are still smart about that and I believe they will see straight off that this is an invitation to role play, to thinking out of the box, and the robust use of color and composition grabs a tight hold!

strongasabear1Resources/Activities: discuss the analogies made and make a new list and act them out; use in an art class to discuss how to use a limited color palette to extend powerful messages and imagery.

StrongAsABear2.jpgFor more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

strongasabearback

PPBF: Eerie Dearies

EerieDeariesCoverAuthor/Illustrator: Rebecca Chaperon
Publisher: Simply Read Books, 2014
Age: 9-14
Themes: academic absence, alphabet, concept book
OpeningA is for astral projection.
Summary: (from Amazon) Eerie Dearies is an unusual book that offers a carefully crafted & alphabetized selection of twenty-six beautifully illustrated excuses for being awol from school. Faded and well-used book covers serve as compelling backgrounds to each of these delicately rendered acrylic paintings, creating an atmosphere akin to an old and dusty collection of darkly humorous myths..

EerieDearies1.jpgWhy I like this book: Reminds me so much of Edward Gorey’s sense of humor. Not for the little ones, but I thought since the postings on Susanna Hill’s blog are on summer hiatus I could slip this one in for the older kids.

EerieDearies2Resources/Activities: Make your own list of ‘excuses’ and illustrate them, with pencil, ink collage, etc.; read Edward Gorey’s The Gashlycrumb Tinies – watch the read-aloud video HERE

EerieDearies3For more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

 

PPBF: 3 Counting Books

TwoMiceCoverAuthor/Illustrator: Sergio Ruzzier
Publisher: Clarion, 2015
Summary: review from Kirkus – HERE

One,Two:UngerercoverAuthor/Illustrator: Tomi Ungerer
Publisher: Phaidon, 2014 (first published in Gernman, Diogenes, 1973)
Summary: review from Kirkus – HERE

123BookCoverAuthor/Illustrator: R.O. Blechman
Publisher: Creative Editions, 2013
Summary: review from Kirkus – HERE

Why I like these books: I found these three in short succession, so I thought I’d share them together. Each has deceptively simple yet engaging artwork and at the same time is completely unique in content – key to a great concept book! And my personal preference – they’re all humorous! I’ve linked each for further information via their Kirkus review (above).

Resources/Activities: Read them together – or with other counting books; create your own, with drawings or photos of items from the classroom or home;

One,Two:Unger3

123Book1

For more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.