PPBF: The Bear & the Fly

78294F3D-7136-4FBD-AD20-0A65CF670014Author/Illustrator: Paula Winter
Publisher: Crown Publishers, 1976
Age: 4-7
Themes: bears, disaster, wordless picturebook

7B725FE6-CEA8-4285-B45D-CA56E962C41FSummary: (from my library’s catalog) A bear tries to catch a fly with disastrous results.

I like this book because: It’s a book we would likely not see published today, which is a shame. Kids understand how one family member’s distractions, weaknesses, and faults affect the whole family and may well be able to identify, and also see the foolishness and humor in obsessions. The illustration style is still highly attractive and effective today. I also love the handy size: 5.5”x7”

F70ABB44-65CB-4141-8FAB-C529D139EA8CResources/Activities: Study wordless picturebooks; how do artists what to draw to move a story forwards and create a page turner without text?; consider other solutions for this family – how could this story have ended differently? Watch the video at the bottom of the post.

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PPBF: Who Needs Donuts?

108F05E3-5EB9-4A47-8609-C28BFF743312Author/Illustrator: Mark Alan Stamaty
Publisher: Alfred A. Knopf, 1973
Age: 4+
Themes: obsession, donuts, love
Opening: Sam lived with his family in a nice house. He had a big yard and lots of friends.

6CC0A80E-017C-436A-9AD1-DE9D2A36E916Summary: (from my library’s catalog) Young Sam leaves home to satisfy his craving for donuts, finds a job with a donut collector, and discovers the answer to the question “Who needs donuts when you got love?”

AD0A64BA-F2E3-442D-A67E-C9D063E8E86CI like this book because: It’s a classic gem of a quirky picture book, and apparently loved by many, as it was the search for copies that lead the publisher to renew true copyright and reprint the book nearly 30 years later. A book for a road trip, for sure, as there is so much to discover on every inch of every page! Crazy-silly story that against all odds is completely satisfying! Do look for it!

39FD64D1-3092-4F46-85B2-CD3E89B8BB48Resources/Activities: (assign small groups to) count the numbers of animals, cars, people, donuts, shoes, any technicals impossibilities, etc.; draw your own city scenes with  made up street signs; take this with you on a road trip

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Just thought the label goes with the book, innit?

For more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE

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PPBF: Seamus’s Short Story

ACA0DA74-4328-4DC9-8117-F14FB42E13ADAuthor: Heather Hart-Sussman
Illustrator:
Milan Pavlovic
Publisher:
Groundwood, 2017
Age: 3-7

Themes: acceptance, height, resourcefulness
Opening: There is no doubt about it. Seamus is short. And from where Seamus is standing the world appears to be made for tall people.

80D6BEA9-E2E5-49FA-953E-BF07E4FEE320Summary: (from my library catalog) Wishing he could be taller, Seamus tries everything he can think of, until one day he discovers his mother’s high-heeled shoes.

00F2D86A-395D-45E2-BC62-1B25BC11A1C2I like this book because: it teaches about the natural consequences of a problem leading to a solution, and invites kids to make their own mistakes, and all that with a good pinch of dry humor. I love the bright and edgy, loose and energetic illustrations which are easy to connect to and read on an emotional level.

261E4E22-FCE1-470E-A8AB-C461293B0A0CResources/Activities: talk about problems we might have in our own lives and brainstorm solutions together, accepting all ideas as valid, and discuss why mistakes and failure are an important part of our endeavors.

 

FD2799B1-A400-45A9-B9E2-F17B00901F4CFor more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

ECF367A4-025C-480C-BEB7-782AD4EA76BF

PPBF: She Made a Monster

64BDFBE4-F98E-451B-B5C6-184A3F44D296Author: Lynn Fulton
Illustrator:
Felicita Saal
Publisher:
Penguin/Random House, 2018
Age: 5
-12
Themes: Mary Shelley, horror writing, Frankenstein
Opening: Two hundred years ago, on a wild, stormy night in a beautiful house on the shores of Lake Geneva in Switzerland, a young woman named Mary sat at her dressing table .

82FBA8EC-E2E0-49A8-BD66-D37FE0FEA421Summary: (from my library catalog) On a stormy night two hundred years ago, a young woman named Mary waited for inspiration. Her friend, the poet Lord Byron, had challenged her to write a scary story, but no ideas would come. Mary thought back through her life at the eerie things she had seen in her childhood and the losses she had suffered. But nothing was as scary as her own imagination. As she drifted off to sleep, she pictured something monstrous, a creature that was so frightening, people would run from it in terror. And when Mary awoke, she had her story. — adapted from cover flap.

5676D8DD-E072-4152-9130-5A1470D7B1FAI like this book because: it’s a delicately rendered, exciting telling of the creative impulse behind this world classic. So many layers and just eerie enough to entice readers to delve into the book themselves. (Sorry for the horrible glare in the photos – hope you seek out a copy to right my wrong!)

145A839E-95FC-4047-9F1F-DE4CDC48E7C4Resources/Activities: for the macabre-friendly: disassemble doll or action figure parts and reassemble, going your old toys new life – which can also be used for Halloween decorations.

29C295A2-3759-4C58-B4A9-2CCF4EE2E264For more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

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PPBF: Barfburger Baby, I Was Here First

D4D921A2-205A-46AD-8B05-DE7FE33A2270Author: Paula Danziger
Illustrator:
G. Brian Karas
Publisher:
G.P.Putnam’s Sons, 2014
Age: 
4-8
Themes: babies, brothers, jealousy
Opening: “Isn’t he the sweetest little baby brother?” Mom asks. She’s making silly faces at Daniel. Daniel has gunk all over his face. He looks like he spit up a space blob. “He’s just a Barfburger Baby,” I whisper to myself.

12AEBE53-6C51-4750-92C9-512FF001FB91Summary: (from my library catalog) Five-year-old Jonathon is not pleased when neighbors and relatives come to visit and admire his new baby brother.

E4F2E6FF-4890-4E66-93B4-4A58EB2775E3I like this book because: I was on the lookout for new baby/siblings books, as one of my Storytime gang is expecting a baby sister next year. This one would be a good choice if my little friend were just a year older, but it touched me, even if I have no recollection of my own little brother being born (and I was not there first!). It’s a poignant, funny and beautifully written story depicting the stark reality of navigating a new world where all the attention is no longer on you! And I am a HUGE fan of Karas’ work, which is what made me pick this book out in the first place. Just look what he can do with dots for eyes!

FD33ABCB-C3B7-4FB1-AB3A-4C7A7323B302Resources/Activities: I asked my Storytime gang what kind of objects we could hand to a baby by drawing them out (they also loved watching me draw and guessing what the next object would be): a comb? A bottle? A teddy bear? An apple? A tree? We also talked about how our behavior has to change in the presence of a very new baby, and what we will be able to teach a baby.

FA75B8CA-D8ED-4159-8372-F3B09A3BE9AEFor more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.3D35F502-453A-4AB9-85A1-BF73A36816F9

PPBF: I Can See Just Fine

ECC9575E-0D3E-452B-9F6C-BC53FCC941F6Author/Illustrator: Eric Barclay
Publisher: Abrams Appleseed, 2013
Age: 3-7
Themes: eyeglasses, vision, humorous stories
Opening: see image below

D374594A-000A-45C0-9D7F-59657D41F634Summary: (from my library’s catalog) Though Paige claims, “I can see just fine, ” her parents grow concerned and decide it’s time for Paige to visit the eye doctor. Paige remains defiant until she finds the perfect frames and more importantly, perfect eyesight.

EE0B6BDF-601B-4841-9D09-19923A50260BI like this book because: Last week’s storytime theme was eyewear, and though I didn’t get the chance to read this one to the gang, it is worthy of a post! I love the simple graphic style of rendering in a sweet, macaron palette, and the endearing main character who we all must feel we know well! Perfectly informative without being pedagogical!

E5E54E96-327B-40B3-B32D-D8A0C7BAD40EResources/Activities: See last week’s post HERE

51E2A745-C007-4BA7-BEEC-860F7E0B61CFFor more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE

BE07B5C5-B74D-4E01-A7FA-688C9CAD20EF

PPBF: Mrs. Mole, I’m Home!

5A171614-7664-4A93-943D-91042655DB72Author/Illustrator: Jarvis
Publisher: Candlewick , 2018
Age: 2-6
Themes: moles, eyeglasses, home
Opening: see image below

21CC8492-AD33-4E68-97C1-E46DEC23BA93Summary: (from my library’s catalog) Morris Mole can’t find his glasses, but he’s certain he can get home without them. So off he burrows, and up he pops…. ‘Mrs. Mole, I’m home!’ But is he?

D7FBEA9F-D6CF-4159-805C-0A05519E2BF4I like this book because: It was SUCH a hit with my storytime gang and the adults in the room too! Fun bright illustrations with plenty to pour over in side jokes (look at those worms!) and perfect pacing to keep the whole crowd happy and asking for more!

2BE572AB-0309-4C04-B325-25827AC9219CResources/Activities: we made paper eyeglasses to color, and I brought any type of eyewear I could find in the house for them all to try on, even a pair with a nose and moustache – which I must say looked best worn upside down!

51AC5AFB-7ACF-40D5-85F5-06159AE02A89For more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE

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PPBF: Look!

D3BFCDEB-F76D-4604-A646-1051455DEB1DAuthor/Illustrator: Fiona Woodcock
Publisher: Greenwillow , 2018
Age: 3-7
Themes: double-letter words, spelling, concept books
OpeningFood.

36EB1BED-A5B0-4B65-A89A-81B37F2EB7B2Summary: (from my library’s catalog) A brother and sister spend an exciting day at the zoo where they find balloons, baboons, kangaroos, and more. Told entirely through illustrations and single words containing a double “O”.

55E63D2A-4826-4A44-880A-4157CE5B0F68I like this book because: It’s beautifully and cleverly illustrated, with just enough texture and detail to keep you looking at each detail on each page, and yet the concept is soo simple! Just LOOK!

E977BA4F-1BBA-4745-94F4-A7EE7868200AResources/Activities: Play a Guess My Rule game I learned from watching Zoom as a kid, which can be expanded upon – HERE; What other words do you know that have double letters?

08C8D2C1-57FB-4741-9B34-5FE5323A75F5For more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERECB508097-CC96-4CF5-8850-2A8B6D1BBB57

PPBF: My Family Tree and Me

6922A63A-2A78-49D5-8D15-7632EAEECFEAAuthor/Illustrator: Dušan Petričić
Publisher: Kids Can Press , 2015
Age: 5+
Themes: family, genealogy, concept books
OpeningA long, long, time ago there lived my great-great-grandfather and mygreat-great-grandmother.

CABA14B5-BC71-42B4-B160-65CF11B8AB73Summary: (from my library’s catalog) Come explore a boy’s family tree one side at a time, starting from the front of his photo album and then starting from the back–and see how they come together in the middle!

00F3DF28-8C80-4216-ADF4-EC2731EA5D46I like this book because: of the nifty idea to have the two (family) sides come together in the middle! AND it’s sooooo beautifully rendered! You might remember Petričić’s illustrations for another wonderful book: The Man With The Violin, written by Kathy Stinson – watch the trailer/interview below.

EDEED7C1-FE45-401E-9838-1A2D49BD55DCResources/Activities: Research your family tree by asking relatives for help; ask relatives for favorite stories about family members.

CC8A9FCB-9AA0-473E-8C49-EFB23A70EEBFFor more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

PPBF: The Mediterranean

79225BCA-E2F4-4E87-918F-85444F57B380Author/Illustrator: Armin Greder
Publisher: Allen & Unwin, 2017, originally publ. in Italy
Age: 8+
Themes: refugees, shipwrecks, Mediterranean region
Opening: After he had finished drowning, his body sank slowly to the bottom, where the fish were waiting.

BE720432-243B-4E89-94B9-B68D37B4226ESummary: (from my library’s catalog) A lifeless body. One of many in the waters of the Mediterranean. Precarious boats navigate the waters of the sea, from south to north. And more often than not, it is not only hope that drowns. The author and illustrator uses his distinctive charcoal drawings to depict a dark world with a global dimension. The only words in the story are a single sentence indicating what is happening to the body in the water in the first picture. From there on the reader needs to examine the pictures to draw conclusions about how that body came to be in the sea. An afterword by Alessandro Leogrande, an Italian journalist who writes about social, political and environmental issues, fills in thebackground about the ‘food chain’ portrayed in this disturbing picture book which demands discussion.

F540E815-8E99-4787-A5C5-2786C5340836I like this book because: It is so powerful! Migration has always been an important issue, but especially now in it’s forced impact, and of our time on earth, and, I believe, one we will have to deal with on a myriad of levels and layers all over the world at least for the rest of my lifetime. And a wordless picture book may be the perfect vehicle for discussion. The execution makes the very best use of strong yet simple composition and contrast, limited palette, and loose rendering to deliver equally on an emotional and thought-provoking level. Pow!

6EEC960E-95FF-44A9-9726-4F170A97F644Resources/Activities: Make this a weekly discussion, where new ideas and thoughts may be brought up to ponder over and over.

3D934AD2-FE41-4445-A713-393EEA208A68For more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

83C32394-F084-4C1A-8A61-B00A5ED9F0EA