PPBF: Our Car

BCC3A07E-CBC6-453F-BE02-2644E9E80458Author: J.M. Brum
Illustrator: 
Jan Bajtlik
Publisher: 
Roaring Brook Press, 2018
Age: 
2-6
Themes: cars, toys, imagination
OpeningOur car is as red as a fire engine.

6B86FB8E-9A9C-4415-9EDB-EB75D493BEE0Summary: (from my library catalog) A child describes the family car, which is as red as a fire engine, and is driven by his father through wind, snow, and all seasons.

45025787-AFDD-475F-967C-610229365D8BI like this book because: It’s so simple (yeah, you know me!), fun, elegant and a great aid in teaching small bodies with big minds about reading pictures! I brought this book to my regular coffee date with ‘old’ folks (me and my friends!) and everyone picked it up to look at of their own accord, laughed, smiled, and said, “So cute!” Perfect holiday gift for a young friend. And yes, Virginia, even grown-ups enjoy great picture books!

2AC128D6-0224-47F3-97CC-DF1F0C2EF43EResources/Activities: draw with oil pastels on dark paper for a night-time ‘ride’; recreate the car images with chalk on sidewalks; act out the story with toy cars; make a map on a large piece of paper where your toy cars can roam; create your own toy car out of a cardboard box and ‘race’ your friends!

84FC066F-BA5D-4A6A-8D47-008ADEC0FA69For more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

Advertisements

PPBF: I Do Not Like Books Anymore!

CD43691B-C78F-46F6-B61A-1B36280C5716Author/Illustrator: Daisy Horst
Publisher: Candlewick Press, 2018
Age: 3-7
Themes: siblings, reading, books
Opening: Natalie and Alphonse really liked books and stories.

4621BE25-012C-4A13-A5DF-D09C60149840Summary: (from my library’s catalog/amazon) Natalie and Alphonse REALLY like books. So when it’s time for Natalie to learn to read, she thinks it will be exciting — she can have all the stories in the world now, and even read them to Alphonse. But when Natalie gets her first reading book, the letters look like squiggles and it isn’t even a good story; it’s just about a cat that can sit. “I do not like books anymore!” Natalie declares. But she still wants to make up stories. With Alphonse’s help, can she find a way to turn a love of telling stories into a love of reading stories?

07A3DCBC-3C89-446A-8657-C32B8C537884I like this book because: It’s an adorable take on the trials and tribulations of learning to read. For my daughter it was such a chore, and for my son the words danced on the page, so I can easily see how reader’s will identify with Natalie’s plight. The illustrations are cute yet not too sweet and very easy for picture readers!

FA1C9E18-8CF0-4809-8A7E-5EF2F950721BResources/Activities: make a story with pictures and have a reading writer help put down the words, just like the siblings did in this book; create your own stories using toys of your own; make a display for your favorite book, using props, drawings, even food!

8E563E15-FA86-418C-BD82-AA245FC51C5BFor more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE

PPBF: Steadfast Tin Soldier

BF4E6FA6-4C03-493F-B876-7639EF42B552Author: Hans Christian Andersen/Joohee Yoon
Illustrator: 
Joohee Yoon
Publisher:
Enchanted Lion Books, 2016
Age: 4
-8
Themes: Toys, fairytales
OpeningOnce there were five and twenty tin soldiers, all of them brothers, being made from the same tin spoon.

40DC6820-6B08-4358-AD9C-58B4394C3A66Summary: (from my library catalog) The perilous adventure of a toy soldier who loves a paper dancing girl culminates in tragedy for both of them.

50418E2F-E08A-4019-BA19-EFC8A307EE0CI like this book because: I love fairytales, especially around the holidays – nostalgia? – and this is such a beautiful version! The text is also more palatable for younger ears, but together with the illustrations this is a book that multiple ages can enjoy together.

F61D2F46-EC28-46A3-8466-4601A17ACBD0Resources/Activities: create art using just two colors, or one color and black; read more fairytales together! I find that winter-break was always a good time to bake, read, drink tea or hot cocoa, and just enjoy being together.

F18CF510-F6D6-44C1-B511-02C4BA7FDDF4For more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE

A17B5289-630C-4DCB-BCAF-19C4592BE6C4

PPBF: Night Job

91DC9551-5692-4504-AE10-28E45D850209Author: Karen Hesse
Illustrator: 
G. Brian Karas
Publisher:
Candlewick Press, 2018
Age: 4
-8
Themes: Fathers and sons, night work , nighttime
OpeningOn Friday nights, when the sun goes down, I snap the clips shut on Dad’s lunchbox and climb onto the back of his bike.

E0BD83FF-F2F4-4723-BD75-3CB02BC10306Summary: (from my library catalog) What is it like to work at night, while the rest of the city is asleep? Newbery Medalist Karen Hesse’s quietly powerful story of a boy and his father is tenderly brought to life by G. Brian Karas in this luminous tribute to an enduring, everyday sort of love.

91F16415-2941-4F24-A6C0-AFBB08082591I like this book because: employment is a part of life that each family deals with differently and yet is seldom discussed. In Night Job the images are evocative of what can make the night seem almost dream-like and magical, and the writing Is equally transportive – it would be a neat idea to read this a second time around with the listener’s eyes closed!

DBCCB011-55DB-4441-BF2B-1EB7DCB854B2Resources/Activities: talk about jobs, regular hours, night shifts, and different forms of employment; discuss the pros and cons of these different forms; what do kids in school think of their ‘jobs’ as students, the hours, and ‘time off’?

E9FB38EC-A921-42D8-9965-A768C6E747AEFor more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE

PPBF: 13 Words

34BFFD2A-2060-4CA2-9E5D-B1D4188226A0Author: Daniel Handler
Illustrator: 
Maira Kalman
Publisher:
Harper Collins, 2010
Age: 5-8

Themes: birds, dogs, words
Opening: Word number 1: Bird. The bird sits on the table.

33FAFDAA-A498-43E1-B31E-BD948894BDEBSummary: (from my library catalog) A dog attempts to cheer up his friend, a despondent bird, in a tale that introduces a series of words from “baby” to “haberdashery.”

9E34F3C9-5792-43F2-993C-5F0455B096FFI like this book because: It was introduced to me by an enthusiastic 6yr old! The pictures are bright, funny and engaging, the concept is simple, the story silly and playful, and invites readers to play with words too!

6AC56B5B-7E43-40A6-BDD4-561B57B71D66Resources/Activities: write short stories based off your own set of 13 words, maybe have the words chosen out of a hat; try writing a story based off of 2 characters, one object, one location/setting and a happy of sad ending; draw at least one illustration based off of the stories.

1A444FF3-9FCB-406D-8CE8-CABE65AB956EFor more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

PPBF: The Wall In the Middle of the Book

F895AFF1-C2AA-417B-95C4-3E83C0AB704DAuthor/Illustrator: Jon Agee
Publisher: Dial, 2018
Age: 3-7
Themes: knights, assumptions, walls
Opening: There’s a wall in the middle of the book. And it’s a good thing.

8ABDCC0D-6276-467D-B049-1ADE82212B28Summary: (from my library’s catalog) A knight who feels secure on his side of the wall that divides his book discovers that his side is not as safe as he thought, and the other side is not as threatening.

932C98E5-5437-4D42-992E-43F69838A7C1I like this book because: I live for picture books with humor so dry, concepts so simple, yet all brought together elegantly! And when the function of text and pictures can only work together, just as the maker intended, well, the stars shine brighter, don’t they?

73887F17-2A61-4FF3-AB11-F34983B06D5AResources/Activities: once you’ve read the book together a few times (because you’ll want to) discuss each spread and all the elements present that help deliver the picture book maker’s intentions; act the whole thing out as a play; imagine what happens after the last page.

CB959A92-B952-4D78-9100-69359798F65BFor more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE

 

PPBF: The Bear & the Fly

78294F3D-7136-4FBD-AD20-0A65CF670014Author/Illustrator: Paula Winter
Publisher: Crown Publishers, 1976
Age: 4-7
Themes: bears, disaster, wordless picturebook

7B725FE6-CEA8-4285-B45D-CA56E962C41FSummary: (from my library’s catalog) A bear tries to catch a fly with disastrous results.

I like this book because: It’s a book we would likely not see published today, which is a shame. Kids understand how one family member’s distractions, weaknesses, and faults affect the whole family and may well be able to identify, and also see the foolishness and humor in obsessions. The illustration style is still highly attractive and effective today. I also love the handy size: 5.5”x7”

F70ABB44-65CB-4141-8FAB-C529D139EA8CResources/Activities: Study wordless picturebooks; how do artists what to draw to move a story forwards and create a page turner without text?; consider other solutions for this family – how could this story have ended differently? Watch the video at the bottom of the post.

99977D81-A3AD-4530-A5F5-79F5849BEE46

 

PPBF: Who Needs Donuts?

108F05E3-5EB9-4A47-8609-C28BFF743312Author/Illustrator: Mark Alan Stamaty
Publisher: Alfred A. Knopf, 1973
Age: 4+
Themes: obsession, donuts, love
Opening: Sam lived with his family in a nice house. He had a big yard and lots of friends.

6CC0A80E-017C-436A-9AD1-DE9D2A36E916Summary: (from my library’s catalog) Young Sam leaves home to satisfy his craving for donuts, finds a job with a donut collector, and discovers the answer to the question “Who needs donuts when you got love?”

AD0A64BA-F2E3-442D-A67E-C9D063E8E86CI like this book because: It’s a classic gem of a quirky picture book, and apparently loved by many, as it was the search for copies that lead the publisher to renew true copyright and reprint the book nearly 30 years later. A book for a road trip, for sure, as there is so much to discover on every inch of every page! Crazy-silly story that against all odds is completely satisfying! Do look for it!

39FD64D1-3092-4F46-85B2-CD3E89B8BB48Resources/Activities: (assign small groups to) count the numbers of animals, cars, people, donuts, shoes, any technicals impossibilities, etc.; draw your own city scenes with  made up street signs; take this with you on a road trip

4E746C88-7595-4A63-AA82-4098632A2EC2

Just thought the label goes with the book, innit?

For more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE

04617412-8F6F-4126-B6B7-603AB762E4F9

PPBF: Seamus’s Short Story

ACA0DA74-4328-4DC9-8117-F14FB42E13ADAuthor: Heather Hart-Sussman
Illustrator:
Milan Pavlovic
Publisher:
Groundwood, 2017
Age: 3-7

Themes: acceptance, height, resourcefulness
Opening: There is no doubt about it. Seamus is short. And from where Seamus is standing the world appears to be made for tall people.

80D6BEA9-E2E5-49FA-953E-BF07E4FEE320Summary: (from my library catalog) Wishing he could be taller, Seamus tries everything he can think of, until one day he discovers his mother’s high-heeled shoes.

00F2D86A-395D-45E2-BC62-1B25BC11A1C2I like this book because: it teaches about the natural consequences of a problem leading to a solution, and invites kids to make their own mistakes, and all that with a good pinch of dry humor. I love the bright and edgy, loose and energetic illustrations which are easy to connect to and read on an emotional level.

261E4E22-FCE1-470E-A8AB-C461293B0A0CResources/Activities: talk about problems we might have in our own lives and brainstorm solutions together, accepting all ideas as valid, and discuss why mistakes and failure are an important part of our endeavors.

 

FD2799B1-A400-45A9-B9E2-F17B00901F4CFor more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

ECF367A4-025C-480C-BEB7-782AD4EA76BF

PPBF: She Made a Monster

64BDFBE4-F98E-451B-B5C6-184A3F44D296Author: Lynn Fulton
Illustrator:
Felicita Saal
Publisher:
Penguin/Random House, 2018
Age: 5
-12
Themes: Mary Shelley, horror writing, Frankenstein
Opening: Two hundred years ago, on a wild, stormy night in a beautiful house on the shores of Lake Geneva in Switzerland, a young woman named Mary sat at her dressing table .

82FBA8EC-E2E0-49A8-BD66-D37FE0FEA421Summary: (from my library catalog) On a stormy night two hundred years ago, a young woman named Mary waited for inspiration. Her friend, the poet Lord Byron, had challenged her to write a scary story, but no ideas would come. Mary thought back through her life at the eerie things she had seen in her childhood and the losses she had suffered. But nothing was as scary as her own imagination. As she drifted off to sleep, she pictured something monstrous, a creature that was so frightening, people would run from it in terror. And when Mary awoke, she had her story. — adapted from cover flap.

5676D8DD-E072-4152-9130-5A1470D7B1FAI like this book because: it’s a delicately rendered, exciting telling of the creative impulse behind this world classic. So many layers and just eerie enough to entice readers to delve into the book themselves. (Sorry for the horrible glare in the photos – hope you seek out a copy to right my wrong!)

145A839E-95FC-4047-9F1F-DE4CDC48E7C4Resources/Activities: for the macabre-friendly: disassemble doll or action figure parts and reassemble, going your old toys new life – which can also be used for Halloween decorations.

29C295A2-3759-4C58-B4A9-2CCF4EE2E264For more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

387670B4-583D-4030-8C39-8AD57882F7EE