PPBF: A Summery Saturday Morning

SummerySaturdayMorningCoverPPBF on Susanna Hill’s blog is taking a nap – a long summer slumber – but I can’t help myself – gotta share books I think are ‘pickcha poifect’! (I’m allowed to tawk like that – originally from LonGisland, NY).

SummerySaturdayMorningEndpapersAuthor: Margaret Mahy
Illustrator: Selina Young
Publisher: Viking/Penguin Group, 1998
Ages: 2-6
Themes: dogs, summer, stories in rhyme
Opening: We take the dogs down the wiggly track,/The wiggly track, the wiggly track./One dog’s whoite and the other dog’s black/ On a summery Saturday morning.
Summary: (from my library catalog) Nothing seems to go as planned on their Saturday morning, but the children enjoy themselves.

SummerySaturdayMorning1I like this book because: it’s a rollicking read-aloud with a funny storyline with cheerful watercolors that play up the fun. I really appreciate Margaret Mahy’s playful way with words.

SummerySaturdayMorning3Resources/activities: watch this New Zealand TV trailer for a Margaret Mahy documentary, even if we can’t get out hands on the film here in the US – it’s still fun!; take a walk on a summery morning and describe what you encounter – maybe in a rhyme?!SummerySaturdayMorningSpot

For existing PPBF selections including resources and activities, go to Susanna Hill’s blog: HERE

PPBF: The Little Red Hen

LRHcoverAuthor/Illustrator: Paui Galdone
Publisher: Clarion, 1973
Ages: 3-7yrs
Themes: folk tale, animals, just rewards
Opening: Once upon a time a cat and a dog and a mouse and a little red hen all lived together in a cozy little house.
Summary: (from my library catalog)The little red hen finds none of her lazy friends willing to help her plant, harvest, or grind wheat into flour, but all are eager to eat the cake she makes from it.

DSC01146I like this book because: it is the didactic tale we all know, but what I like is that the hen does not give in, and that leads into the discussion of right and wrong so much better than versions where the hen decides to share. But who is kidding who here? I chose it for the illustrations! Specifically for the character designs and the way Galdone lends emotion to the character’s faces and postures, making visual reading so much fun!

LRH3Resources/activities: bake bread; make pretend/playdough bread using rolling pins; try assorted breads in class – have a taste test.

LRH5For more PPBF selections including resources and activities, go to Susanna Hill’s blog: HERE

LRHspot

PPBF: Rosie and the Nightmares

RosieCoverAuthor/Illustrator: Philip Waechter
Publisher: Handprint Books, 2005; originally in German, Verlagsgruppe Belz, 2005; translation: Christopher Franceschelli
Ages: 3-7yrs
Themes: fear, nightmares, monsters
Opening: Rosie looked deep into the dark red maw. Sharp teeth glittered. Rosie knew her hour had come. She had only seconds left…
Summary: (from my library catalog) Tired of having nightmares about monsters, Rosie the rabbit decides to confront her fears.

Rosie1I like this book because: Yup, sold by the cover. I truly admire illustrators who can make great use of negative space in their compositions, and Waechter is one of them. I was very fortunate to see an exhibit of original work of his at the Wilhelm Busch Museum, in Hannover, Germany in March. This is a great story too, of a rabbit who not only confronts her fears, but OWNS them!

Rosie3Resources/activities: discuss different kinds of fears and the sometimes hilarious names for them, as well as suggestions on how to confront them; draw your own monsters (because that’s what I wanted to do after reading this!).

Rosie4aFor more PPBF selections including resources and activities, go to Susanna Hill’s blog: HERE

RosieSpot

PPBF: The Fox Went Out on a Chilly Night

FoxChillyNightCoverAuthor/Illustrator: Peter Spier
Publisher: Doubleday Books for Young readers, 1961, 2014
Ages: 3-7yrs
Themes: fox, folk song, New England
Opening: The fox went out on a chilly night, and he prayed to the moon to give him light,for he’d many miles to go that night before he reached the town-o, town-o, town-o…
Summary: (from my library catalog) The countryside of New England is depicted in the pictures accompanying this folk song in which a fox travels many miles to get dinner for his wife and ten cubs. Includes musical notation.

FoxChillyNightTitlePageI like this book because: my sister used to lead us in song on long car rides while we were growing up, and one of our favorite drives was to go leaf peeping in New England, specifically into Connecticut, every Columbus Day. Though never out-of-print, this reissue is now full-color, as the illustrator was asked to add to the black and white spreads of the original book – over fifty years later! I enjoy both versions.

FoxChillyNight3Resources/activities: learn to sing the song – music in the back of the book; discuss how a folk song might be different than a pop song, and list songs a family might enjoy singing on a car ride (just as the author and his wife sang this one!), as well as other activities we engage in to pass the time.

FoxChillyNight4For more PPBF selections including resources and activities, go to Susanna Hill’s blog: HERE

FoxChillyNight5