PPBF: Book! Book! Book!

Book!coverAuthor: Deborah Bruss
Illustrator: Tiphanie Beeke
Publisher: Arthur A. Levine, 2001
Age: 1-4
Themes: domestic animals, libraries, books
Opening: (see image below)

Book!1.jpgSummary: (from my library catalog) When the children go back to school, the animals on the farm are bored, so they go into the library in town trying to find something to do.

Book!2Why I like this book: My friend and ‘professional’ babysitter, Mila, recommended this to me years ago. Still packs a solid punch. I was recently lamenting about a beautiful new book with a very flat story and wonder why so many books get published that just don’t make the cut when read aloud, as I am sure EVRY writer, or wanna-be writer does. This is visually engaging AND it has perfect pacing and a solid story with a very funny ending – do look for it!!

Book!3.jpgResources/Activities: discuss what a librarian does; take a field-trip to the library, arrange (ahead) for the children’s librarian to give your child(ren) a ‘tour’; take home a new-to-you book! book! book!

Book!4.jpgFor more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

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PPBF: Nothing Rhymes With Orange

NRWOcoverAuthor/Illustrator: Adam Rex
Publisher: Chronicle, 2017
Age: 4-8
Themes: fruit, rhyme, rhyming stories
Opening: Who wouldn’t travel anywhere to get an apple or a pear?

NRWOendpapersSummary: (from my library catalog) All the fruits gather together and enjoy a rhyming party, but poor Orange feels left out because he does not rhyme with anything–until Apple invents a new word..

NRWO1.pngWhy I like this book: I want to believe Rex wrote this for picture book writers! So funny, so true, and writing in rhyme is SO hard! It’f fun and funny in all aspects and I really like the fresh compositions with mixed media. Great read aloud for a slightly older group of PB readers, maybe best for early elementary classes.

NRWO2Resources/Activities: Play rhyme games: stash a few objects in a bag and have participants reach in for one at a time and come up with a word rhyming with the object.

NRWO3.jpgFor more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

NRWOspot

 

PPBF: Circle, Triangle, Elephant

CTEcoverAuthor: Kenji Oikawa
Illustrator: Mayuko Takeuchi
Publisher: Phaidon, 2017; orig.: Bunkeido Co., 2008
Age: 1-4
Themes: shapes, surprises, concept books
Opening: (see image below)CTE1.jpg

Summary: (from my library catalog) Circle, triangle … elephant!? A big book of shapes, with a bit of silliness mixed in.

CTE2Why I like this book: I love how simple this book for the very young is, yet how much gentle humor is incorporated. I have been reading a lot more board books since I started doing storytime in the bookstore where I work, and get very excited when I find a simple book with more to it. Could be my favorite so far this year!

CTE3.jpgResources/Activities: create a shape-game and have kids can shout out the shape or object you hold up, in groups of three, repeating in ever faster succession. I bet there will be lots of laughs too!

CTE4.pngFor more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

And a little good news via scbwi this morning!!! I posted the image a few weeks ago HERE

DrawThis9:17

PPBF: My Pictures After the Storm

MPAtScoverAuthor/Illustrator: Éric Veillé, translated by Daniel Hahn
Publisher: Gecko Press, 2017; Orig.: Actes Sud, 2014
Age: 2-5
Themes: wit, causation, humorous stories
OpeningMy Pictures. My Pictures after the storm.

MPAtSendpapers.jpgSummary: (from my library catalog) Offers humorous drawings comparing things before and after storms, meetings with elephants, and trips to the hairdresser.

MPAtS1.jpgWhy I like this book: Hilarious! But, come on – who would not have picked up a cover like THAT? This is one readers can really spend their time looking at again and again, figuring out what happened and why. The illustrations are simple in comic-style, with great use of negative space and complimentary colors. So fun!

MPAtS2.jpgResources/Activities: Make your own lists and/or drawings of some of your own belongings and what they might look like after an incidence, like a rainstorm, a day at school, a visit from family or friends, etc.

MPAtS3For more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

MPAtSback

PPBF: Anatole

AnatoleCoverAuthor: Eve Titus
Illustrator: Paul Galdone
Publisher: McGraw-Hill, 1956
Age: 4-8
Themes: mice, cheese, fairness
OpeningIn all France there was no happier, more contented mouse than Anatole.

AnatoletitlepageSummary: (from my library catalog) A French mouse decides to earn an honest living by tasting the cheese in a cheese factory and leaving notes about its quality.

Anatole1Why I like this book: Looks like I am sort of stuck in the past again (will try better next time)! I love the limited color palette set against the black and white ink-wash and Galdone’s loose yet confident style, illustrating a sweet classic story of a French mouse on a mission to change!

Anatole3.pngResources/Activities: come up with a secret way to make someone else’s life or lives better without looking for recognition, like leaving flowers on a doorstep, or mowing someone’s lawn while they are out – or even sending a secret note to make someone smile!

Anatole2For more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

Anatole

PPBF: Marsh Crone’s Brew

MarshCronesBrewFullCover.jpgAuthor/Illustrator: Ib Spang Olsen, translated by Virginia Allen Jensen
Publisher: Abingdon Press, 1960
Age: 5-8
Themes: seasons, marsh people, Danish folk tale
OpeningIn summer when the sun goes down behind the marshes and evening sets in, a kind of white vapor sometimes rises from the swampy ground.

MarshCronesBrew1.pngSummary: (from my library catalog) A retelling of the Danish folktale about the Marsh Crone whose husband looks like a willow bush and whose children are mistaken for grass hillocks. They mix things like moonlight, willow spears, evening dew and stork feathers in a brew that brings spring to the marsh..

MarshCronesBrew3Why I like this book: It fits in my pocket at 6.5×4.5″! Number one priority for me though is to pick up any book that has a great cover, and it does, but this time I was influenced to look for Ib Spang Olsen’s books from singular picture book illustration post by Jama Kim Rattigan . So I put as many as I could on hold through my library, and this is the first title to arrive. It reminds me so much of the landscape where I lived for many years in northern Germany, where the coming of spring is highly anticipated. Hope you can find and enjoy it too!

MarshCronesBrew4Resources/Activities: Read about the Danish author/illustrator HERE;  Read a few more Danish folktales, like The Fat Cat: A Danish Folktale by Jack Kent – or another edition of the same by by Margaret Read MacDonald and Julie Paschkis (Illustrator).

MarshCronesBrew5For more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

#scbwidrawthis

#WILD

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I think I have posted and tagged the entry everywhere else, so why not here too! It’s my entry for this month’s #scbwidrawthis art prompt. Members have the opportunity each month to show their artwork in the online gallery and two pieces will be featured in the SCBWI INSIGHT e-mail. Entries can be added to the online gallery open to public viewing, so agents, art directors and editors have yet another way of finding illustrators. Each month two winners will have their art displayed on the home page and publicized through SCBWI social media channels. So if you are also interested in participating, you have to be an SCBWI member and follow the guidelines HERE. Good luck!

PPBF: The Frog in the Well

FrogInTheWell

Boring cover to you, fantastic typeface to me!

Author: Alvin Tresselt
Illustrator: Roger Duvoisin
Publisher: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard, 1958
Age: 3-6
Themes: dwellings, frogs, reflection
OpeningThere was once a frog who lived in a well, and a fine well it was, too.

 

FrogInTheWellendpapersSummary: Once upon a time there was a frog who lived at the bottom of a well. The well was the frog’s whole world, until the day the well ran dry and the bugs began to disappear. What was happening to the world, the frog wondered, and what could he do? The hungry frog decided he must hop to the top of the well to see what he could of the end of the world. Conquering his fear, he peered out, and what did he see? Trees, flowers, meadows, marshes, and all kinds of end-of-the-world creatures! Entranced, the little frog ventured forth to find out more about the world outside his own. Based on a classic Chinese fable, and written and illustrated by the Caldecott-winning Alvin Tresselt and Roger Duvoisin, The Frog in the Well is a charming tale of one brave frog and his journey into wisdom.

FrogInTheWelltitlepageFrogInTheWell2.jpgWhy I like this book: Oldy but a gooooody! Found this title while I was searching for storytime books with a ‘home’ theme, and fell in love. Wouldn’t be the first time a girl fell for a sweet frog, eh? Still fresh for todays readers.

FrogInTheWell3Resources/Activities: Read about the illustrator HERE though I am sure many of you are familiar with his classics like, Petunia, Veronica, or The Happy Lion! If not – you need to read them! If you just want to wallow in a pool of his wonderful images – click HERE. Make a storytime-craft activity with a paper towel roll, or clothes pins.

FrogInTheWell5For more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

 

PPBF: A Squash and a Squeeze

SquashandaSqueezeCoverAuthor: Julia Donaldson
Illustrator: Axel Scheffler
Publisher: Arthur A. Levine, 2017; first published by Methuen Books, 1993
Age: 3-6
Themes: dwellings, domestic animals, stories in rhyme, humorous stories
Opening: A little old lady lived all by herself with a table and chairs and a jug on the shelf.

SquashandaSqueezeTitlepageSummary: With the help of an old man and all of her animals, an old lady realizes that her house is not as small as she thought it was.

SquashandaSqueeze1Why I like this book: This rollicking rhyme spins an old Jewish folk tale said to be from Poland, is always fun, but made so much sweeter by the master of rhyme herself, Julia Donaldson. Scheffler is able to add so much emotion to the cozy illustrations (the goat’s face while pig raids the cupboard is priceless!), that you might want to move in with all the characters too!

SquashandaSqueezebackResources/Activities: Read about the illustrator HERE;  attempt read every single one of the author’s and illustrator’s collaborations – you won’t be sorry! Read a few more Jewish folktales, like Joseph Had a Little Overcoat, by Simms Tabak, or Such a Noise!, by Aliana Brodmann and Hans Poppel.

SquashandaSqueezeendpapers.jpgFor more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

PPBF: North Is For Polar Bears

Northis4PolarBearsCover.jpgAuthor: Adelaide Holl
Illustrator: J.P. Miller
Publisher: L.W.Singer/RH, 1968
Age: 3-6
Themes: polar bears, North Pole, curiosity
Opening: Pierre was a polar bear. He lived in the Far North, at the very top of the world, where everything is frosted over with ice and snow.

 

Northis4PolarBears1Summary: Story of a curious polar bear enticed by bird’s chatter about the South: the sunshine, the trees and the flowers, and his adventures far from home.

Northis4PolarBears3.jpgWhy I like this book: A sweet and innocent adventure story beautifully illustrated in bright bold colors that still feel fresh and timely.

Northis4PolarBears4Resources/Activities: Read about the illustrator HERE: have a look at some of his art HERE; read some of his other books, or Disney films he worked on like Dumbo, Pinocchio or Fantasia.

For more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.