PPBF: The Wolves of Currumpaw

WolvesOfCurrumpawCoverAuthor/Illustrator: William Grill
Publisher: Flying Eye Books, 2016
Age: 7-14
Themes: wolves, wildlife conservation, New Mexico
OpeningHalf a million wolves once roamed freely across North America, but with the arrival of European settlers the habitats of the animals began to change.

WolvesOfCurrumpawEndpapers
Summary: (from my library catalog) Lobo, the legendary leader of a band of cattle-killing wolves has been terrorizing cattle ranchers and their livestock in the American Southwest. Bounty hunter Ernest Thompson Seton, sets out to trap and exterminate Lobo. “A beautiful re-telling of the first story from Ernest Thompson Seton’s 1898 Classic, Wild Animals I Have Known”–publisher.

WolvesOfCurrumpaw1Resources/Activities: Why I like this book: I deeply admire William Grill’s visual storytelling skills (see my recommendation for Shackleton’s Journey HERE) and was so pleased to find this in the library! I made myself a nice cup of coffee and sat down with it as soon as I got home but barely took a sip, I was so riveted. By the time I finished my coffee was cold, and I was sopping up my tears! A sad AND beautifully told story you will not regret reading. I promise!

WolvesOfCurrumpaw2For more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

WolvesOfCurrumpaw3

 

PPBF: Next to You

NextToYouCoverAuthor: Lori Haskins Houran
Illustrator: Sydney Hanson
Publisher: Albert Whitman, 2016
Age: 2-5
Themes: animals, cuteness, parent/child relationships
OpeningNext to you, the softest puppy in the world is only kind of cute.
Summary: (from my library catalog) When it comes to new babies, friends, or other loved ones, we should remind them of just how darling they are. But are they cuter than a piglet in a sweater? A basket of baby chicks? An elephant calf taking a bath? Of course! Sweet, funny, irreverent, but above all, CUTE, this keepsake-size book is perfect for both gift-giving and cuddly story times.

NextToYou1.pngWhy I like this book: Amazing how this one can be so funny and touching at the same time. You’re going to want to buy this one for someone you like to be next to!

NextToYou2Resources/Activities: great for learning how to draw a child’s face, esp a small child; I could see this being used in a biology class, discussing evolution and how we are wired to take care of our young.

NextToYou3For more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

PPBF: Eerie Dearies

EerieDeariesCoverAuthor/Illustrator: Rebecca Chaperon
Publisher: Simply Read Books, 2014
Age: 9-14
Themes: academic absence, alphabet, concept book
OpeningA is for astral projection.
Summary: (from Amazon) Eerie Dearies is an unusual book that offers a carefully crafted & alphabetized selection of twenty-six beautifully illustrated excuses for being awol from school. Faded and well-used book covers serve as compelling backgrounds to each of these delicately rendered acrylic paintings, creating an atmosphere akin to an old and dusty collection of darkly humorous myths..

EerieDearies1.jpgWhy I like this book: Reminds me so much of Edward Gorey’s sense of humor. Not for the little ones, but I thought since the postings on Susanna Hill’s blog are on summer hiatus I could slip this one in for the older kids.

EerieDearies2Resources/Activities: Make your own list of ‘excuses’ and illustrate them, with pencil, ink collage, etc.; read Edward Gorey’s The Gashlycrumb Tinies – watch the read-aloud video HERE

EerieDearies3For more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

 

PPBF: Two Emberlys Times Two

DrummerHofcoverAuthor: adapted by Barbara Emberly
Illustrator: Ed Emberly
Publisher: Simon & Schuster, 1967
Age: Amazon says 6-9, I say younger!
Themes: cannons, war, folk songs
Opening: Drummer Hof fired it off.
Summary: (from my library catalog) A cumulative folk song in which seven soldiers build a magnificent cannon, but Drummer Hoff fires it off.

DrummerHof4Why I like this book: Folk songs are treasures and I am so grateful that these two picturebook makers have been able to bring them to life with careful pacing and an extraordinary mixture of trippy 60’s and Colonial elements. We could call it Colonial Punk! As fresh and juicy now as they were 50 – FIFTY!! – years ago.

DrummerHof2Resources/Activities: read the folk verse from which the text book was adapted HERE; discuss the clothing and how it differs from uniforms today.DrummerHof3

Beauty x 2 (x2!):

OneWideRivercoverAuthor: Adapted by Barbara Emberly
Illustrator: Ed Emberly
Publisher: first piublished, 1966; First Ammo edition, 2014
Age: 3 and up
Themes: animals, Noah’s Ark, folk songs
OpeningOld Noah built and ark, he built it out of hick’ry bark.
Summary: (from my library catalog) An adaptation of the folksong classic is presented as a counting story about Noah’s Ark and is complemented by silhouette woodcut illustrations.

OneWideRivertitlepage.jpgWhy I like this book: uncomplicated and accessible illustrations propelled by bold background color – need I say more?

OneWideRiver1.jpgResources/Activities: make potato prints with black paint on colored construction paper; discuss why saving life from extinction is important; watch the book trailer HERE; listen to the recording from The Country Gentlemen.

 

OneWideRiver2For more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

PPBF: Ada’s Ideas – Book Birthday

1AdasIdeasCoverAuthor/Illustrator: Fiona Robinson

Publisher: Abrahms, 2016
Age: 6-9
Themes: Ada Lovelace, women mathematicians, computer algorithms
Summary: (from the publisher)Ada Lovelace (1815–1852) was the daughter of Lord Byron, a poet, and Anna Isabella Milbanke, a mathematician. Her parents separated when she was young, and her mother insisted on a logic-focused education, rejecting Byron’s “mad” love of poetry. But Ada remained fascinated with her father and considered mathematics “poetical science.” Via her friendship with inventor Charles Babbage, she became involved in “programming” his Analytical Engine, a precursor to the computer, thus becoming the world’s first computer programmer. This picture book biography of Ada Lovelace is a compelling portrait of a woman who saw the potential for numbers to make art.

2AdasIdeasExOpening: Once there was a girl named Ada who dreamed of making a steam-powered flying horse.

3AdasIdeasWhy I like this book: It’s inspiring to young girls AND beautiful!! I had the great joy of sharing this the day it arrived with my FAC buds, and to see my creative computer geek friends gush over it! Knowing how much effort was put into this from Fiona herself makes it all the more special to me. Bravo, Fiona!

4AdasIdeasResources/Activities: great read for a discussion on applied math, inventors, or female role models; try your hand at paper-cutting – intructables instructions for beginners HERE; check out SCRATCH: computer programming for kids HERE

5AdasIdeasFor more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

6AdasIdeas