PPBF: 13 Words

34BFFD2A-2060-4CA2-9E5D-B1D4188226A0Author: Daniel Handler
Illustrator: 
Maira Kalman
Publisher:
Harper Collins, 2010
Age: 5-8

Themes: birds, dogs, words
Opening: Word number 1: Bird. The bird sits on the table.

33FAFDAA-A498-43E1-B31E-BD948894BDEBSummary: (from my library catalog) A dog attempts to cheer up his friend, a despondent bird, in a tale that introduces a series of words from “baby” to “haberdashery.”

9E34F3C9-5792-43F2-993C-5F0455B096FFI like this book because: It was introduced to me by an enthusiastic 6yr old! The pictures are bright, funny and engaging, the concept is simple, the story silly and playful, and invites readers to play with words too!

6AC56B5B-7E43-40A6-BDD4-561B57B71D66Resources/Activities: write short stories based off your own set of 13 words, maybe have the words chosen out of a hat; try writing a story based off of 2 characters, one object, one location/setting and a happy of sad ending; draw at least one illustration based off of the stories.

1A444FF3-9FCB-406D-8CE8-CABE65AB956EFor more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

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PPBF: Do Not Open

665553D9-D668-49FC-ABAF-68AF614A75E9Author/Illustrator: Brinton Turkle
Publisher: Penguin, 1981
Age: 4-8
Themes: cats, seashore, magic
Opening: Miss Moody lived at land’s end with Captain Kidd. Captain Kidd wasn’t the famous pirate; he was a cat.

262F8ADD-9EB8-412E-85B5-BF026A2B4163Summary: (from my library’s catalog) Following a storm Miss Moody and her cat find an intriguing bottle washed up on the beach. Should they ignore its “Do not open” warning?

300DC470-5B1F-4F67-8082-663099AD57A3I like this book because: Drawn to the illustrations on a another one of Jama Kim Rattigan’s facebook posts, I placed several of Brinton Turkle’s books on hold, and this is one I had enjoyed before with my children. It’s a His use of dramatic pencil lines and efficient yet bold compositions is food for my soul! (I would have preferred not to have the text boxes set in the middle of these lovely images though!) It’s a dramatic little story too!

8FB4948D-1FF9-486C-9B43-061FC3B2C19EResources/Activities: Brinton Turkle’s started making picture books before I was born, and one title, Thy Friend, Obadiah, won a Caldecott Honor Medal in 1970. Look for a pile of his books, ones he wrote and ones he illustrated for others, and enjoy!

DB8CD5D4-F72D-47DF-81ED-20CACF89A89DFor more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE

PPBF: The Wall In the Middle of the Book

F895AFF1-C2AA-417B-95C4-3E83C0AB704DAuthor/Illustrator: Jon Agee
Publisher: Dial, 2018
Age: 3-7
Themes: knights, assumptions, walls
Opening: There’s a wall in the middle of the book. And it’s a good thing.

8ABDCC0D-6276-467D-B049-1ADE82212B28Summary: (from my library’s catalog) A knight who feels secure on his side of the wall that divides his book discovers that his side is not as safe as he thought, and the other side is not as threatening.

932C98E5-5437-4D42-992E-43F69838A7C1I like this book because: I live for picture books with humor so dry, concepts so simple, yet all brought together elegantly! And when the function of text and pictures can only work together, just as the maker intended, well, the stars shine brighter, don’t they?

73887F17-2A61-4FF3-AB11-F34983B06D5AResources/Activities: once you’ve read the book together a few times (because you’ll want to) discuss each spread and all the elements present that help deliver the picture book maker’s intentions; act the whole thing out as a play; imagine what happens after the last page.

CB959A92-B952-4D78-9100-69359798F65BFor more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE

 

PPBF: Penguinaut!

D7D3E475-0EB7-4C28-B11F-9BB049AAC583Author: Marcie Collen
Illustrator: 
Emma Yarlett
Publisher:
Orchard, 2018
Age:
3-7
Themes: penguins, zoo, moon
OpeningOrville was small. His friends were big. And their adventures were bigger

073BC828-75E1-495C-9443-F1BC7BF6EDC9Summary: (from my library catalog) Orville is a little penguin who lives in a zoo and dreams of big adventures, like going to the Moon; the other animals are skeptical, but Orville is determined, so he builds a spaceship and sets out all by himself–and discovers that real adventures are best when they are shared with friends.

34B1586C-2709-43B4-8741-F19801D94552I like this book because: full disclosure: I am biased! This is a BA-BOING brand new picture book from one of my critique partners, and it IS fabulous! Great rhythm and readaloudablity, oodles of onomatopoeia and lots of alliteration! AND I love the mixed media illustrations and adorable KA-BOOM character designs! BLAST OFF to your library and enjoy it yourself!

Nightsky kid's artResources/Activities: create your own milk-carton rockets; make a volcano-styled blast-off with recyclable water bottles, instructions HERE; make night sky art on dark paper, like the one above which I found HERE

EE4BCBB8-FF0D-449E-95E7-8DB218F46B2CFor more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

PPBF: The Bear & the Fly

78294F3D-7136-4FBD-AD20-0A65CF670014Author/Illustrator: Paula Winter
Publisher: Crown Publishers, 1976
Age: 4-7
Themes: bears, disaster, wordless picturebook

7B725FE6-CEA8-4285-B45D-CA56E962C41FSummary: (from my library’s catalog) A bear tries to catch a fly with disastrous results.

I like this book because: It’s a book we would likely not see published today, which is a shame. Kids understand how one family member’s distractions, weaknesses, and faults affect the whole family and may well be able to identify, and also see the foolishness and humor in obsessions. The illustration style is still highly attractive and effective today. I also love the handy size: 5.5”x7”

F70ABB44-65CB-4141-8FAB-C529D139EA8CResources/Activities: Study wordless picturebooks; how do artists what to draw to move a story forwards and create a page turner without text?; consider other solutions for this family – how could this story have ended differently? Watch the video at the bottom of the post.

99977D81-A3AD-4530-A5F5-79F5849BEE46

 

PPBF: The Teeny-Tiny Woman

B6820DF0-0D0C-44BE-AED7-02ECDB326454Author/Illustrator: Paul Galdone
Publisher: Houghtoin Mifflin, 1984
Age: 4-7
Themes: folklore, bones, scary stories
Opening: Once upon a time there was a teeny-tiny woman who lived in a teeny-tiny house in a teeny-tiny village.

73D84345-E247-4653-80CC-0D54882D02E4Summary: (from my library’s catalog) Retells the tale of the teeny-tiny woman who finds a teeny-tiny bone in a churchyard and puts it away in her cupboard before she goes to sleep.

3CB0CE98-617F-4460-AA52-4CDF12E3B4B2I like this book because: It’s a teeny-tiny classic, a re-telling of a folktale that has just the right amount of silly in just the right amount of spooky for not so teeny-tiny kids! The illustrations are cute but not too cute too! And it’s so much fun to read aloud – a priority for me!

2B1B158D-6EBB-4D30-8FA5-8DF57652FCE2Resources/Activities: read this at Halloween or at a sleep-over, or on a dark, rainy afternoon; along with other slightly scary titles like A Creepy Pair Of Underwear/A.Reynolds and P.Brown, Big Bad Bunny/Franny Billingsley and G.Brian Karas

5A83BB81-78B9-4E29-B1D4-57E9CC196556For more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE

88F27848-E8C3-4908-B52E-B29268090F82

PPBF: Who Needs Donuts?

108F05E3-5EB9-4A47-8609-C28BFF743312Author/Illustrator: Mark Alan Stamaty
Publisher: Alfred A. Knopf, 1973
Age: 4+
Themes: obsession, donuts, love
Opening: Sam lived with his family in a nice house. He had a big yard and lots of friends.

6CC0A80E-017C-436A-9AD1-DE9D2A36E916Summary: (from my library’s catalog) Young Sam leaves home to satisfy his craving for donuts, finds a job with a donut collector, and discovers the answer to the question “Who needs donuts when you got love?”

AD0A64BA-F2E3-442D-A67E-C9D063E8E86CI like this book because: It’s a classic gem of a quirky picture book, and apparently loved by many, as it was the search for copies that lead the publisher to renew true copyright and reprint the book nearly 30 years later. A book for a road trip, for sure, as there is so much to discover on every inch of every page! Crazy-silly story that against all odds is completely satisfying! Do look for it!

39FD64D1-3092-4F46-85B2-CD3E89B8BB48Resources/Activities: (assign small groups to) count the numbers of animals, cars, people, donuts, shoes, any technicals impossibilities, etc.; draw your own city scenes with  made up street signs; take this with you on a road trip

4E746C88-7595-4A63-AA82-4098632A2EC2

Just thought the label goes with the book, innit?

For more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE

04617412-8F6F-4126-B6B7-603AB762E4F9

PPBF: Seamus’s Short Story

ACA0DA74-4328-4DC9-8117-F14FB42E13ADAuthor: Heather Hart-Sussman
Illustrator:
Milan Pavlovic
Publisher:
Groundwood, 2017
Age: 3-7

Themes: acceptance, height, resourcefulness
Opening: There is no doubt about it. Seamus is short. And from where Seamus is standing the world appears to be made for tall people.

80D6BEA9-E2E5-49FA-953E-BF07E4FEE320Summary: (from my library catalog) Wishing he could be taller, Seamus tries everything he can think of, until one day he discovers his mother’s high-heeled shoes.

00F2D86A-395D-45E2-BC62-1B25BC11A1C2I like this book because: it teaches about the natural consequences of a problem leading to a solution, and invites kids to make their own mistakes, and all that with a good pinch of dry humor. I love the bright and edgy, loose and energetic illustrations which are easy to connect to and read on an emotional level.

261E4E22-FCE1-470E-A8AB-C461293B0A0CResources/Activities: talk about problems we might have in our own lives and brainstorm solutions together, accepting all ideas as valid, and discuss why mistakes and failure are an important part of our endeavors.

 

FD2799B1-A400-45A9-B9E2-F17B00901F4CFor more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

ECF367A4-025C-480C-BEB7-782AD4EA76BF

PPBF: She Made a Monster

64BDFBE4-F98E-451B-B5C6-184A3F44D296Author: Lynn Fulton
Illustrator:
Felicita Saal
Publisher:
Penguin/Random House, 2018
Age: 5
-12
Themes: Mary Shelley, horror writing, Frankenstein
Opening: Two hundred years ago, on a wild, stormy night in a beautiful house on the shores of Lake Geneva in Switzerland, a young woman named Mary sat at her dressing table .

82FBA8EC-E2E0-49A8-BD66-D37FE0FEA421Summary: (from my library catalog) On a stormy night two hundred years ago, a young woman named Mary waited for inspiration. Her friend, the poet Lord Byron, had challenged her to write a scary story, but no ideas would come. Mary thought back through her life at the eerie things she had seen in her childhood and the losses she had suffered. But nothing was as scary as her own imagination. As she drifted off to sleep, she pictured something monstrous, a creature that was so frightening, people would run from it in terror. And when Mary awoke, she had her story. — adapted from cover flap.

5676D8DD-E072-4152-9130-5A1470D7B1FAI like this book because: it’s a delicately rendered, exciting telling of the creative impulse behind this world classic. So many layers and just eerie enough to entice readers to delve into the book themselves. (Sorry for the horrible glare in the photos – hope you seek out a copy to right my wrong!)

145A839E-95FC-4047-9F1F-DE4CDC48E7C4Resources/Activities: for the macabre-friendly: disassemble doll or action figure parts and reassemble, going your old toys new life – which can also be used for Halloween decorations.

29C295A2-3759-4C58-B4A9-2CCF4EE2E264For more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

387670B4-583D-4030-8C39-8AD57882F7EE

PPBF: Barfburger Baby, I Was Here First

D4D921A2-205A-46AD-8B05-DE7FE33A2270Author: Paula Danziger
Illustrator:
G. Brian Karas
Publisher:
G.P.Putnam’s Sons, 2014
Age: 
4-8
Themes: babies, brothers, jealousy
Opening: “Isn’t he the sweetest little baby brother?” Mom asks. She’s making silly faces at Daniel. Daniel has gunk all over his face. He looks like he spit up a space blob. “He’s just a Barfburger Baby,” I whisper to myself.

12AEBE53-6C51-4750-92C9-512FF001FB91Summary: (from my library catalog) Five-year-old Jonathon is not pleased when neighbors and relatives come to visit and admire his new baby brother.

E4F2E6FF-4890-4E66-93B4-4A58EB2775E3I like this book because: I was on the lookout for new baby/siblings books, as one of my Storytime gang is expecting a baby sister next year. This one would be a good choice if my little friend were just a year older, but it touched me, even if I have no recollection of my own little brother being born (and I was not there first!). It’s a poignant, funny and beautifully written story depicting the stark reality of navigating a new world where all the attention is no longer on you! And I am a HUGE fan of Karas’ work, which is what made me pick this book out in the first place. Just look what he can do with dots for eyes!

FD33ABCB-C3B7-4FB1-AB3A-4C7A7323B302Resources/Activities: I asked my Storytime gang what kind of objects we could hand to a baby by drawing them out (they also loved watching me draw and guessing what the next object would be): a comb? A bottle? A teddy bear? An apple? A tree? We also talked about how our behavior has to change in the presence of a very new baby, and what we will be able to teach a baby.

FA75B8CA-D8ED-4159-8372-F3B09A3BE9AEFor more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.3D35F502-453A-4AB9-85A1-BF73A36816F9