PPBF: Coming and Going

ComingandGoingcoverAuthor: Isabel Minhós Martins
Illustrator: Bernardo Carvalho
Publisher: Tate Publishing, 2014
Age: 5 and up
Themes: nature, transportation, human impact on the environment
OpeningThe head, it is said, is not just for wearing a hat. Feet, we might also say, are not just for wearing shoes.
Summary: (from my library catalog) Humans aren’t the only ones on Earth who travel long distances. Many birds, fish, and mammals migrate hundreds of miles in search of food, warmer climates, or places to raise their young. But it’s not just the incredible distances these creatures travel; it’s the way they do it that makes us slow down and think…

ComingandGoing1Why I like this book: the bold clear graphic style of illustration is a perfect background for a serious and very important subject.

ComingandGoing2Resources/Activities: discuss how we get where we need to go, how that differs depending where one lives: in the city, a town or in a rural area; how do things we need get to us? Great supplement to a unit on transportation.

ComingandGoing4For more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

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PPBF: Mrs. Goose’s Baby

MrsGoosesBabyCover.jpgAuthor/Illustrator: Charlotte Voake
Publisher: Walker, 1989
Age: 3-103
Themes: insects, competition, wordless picture books
Opening: One day Mrs.Goose found an egg and made a nest to put it in.
Summary: (from my library catalog) Mrs. Goose finds an egg, sits on it to keep it safe and warm, and soon has a baby all her own. But Mrs. Goose’s baby isn’t just like her.

MrsGoosesBaby2Why I like this book: This book has a rare quality, quiet yet kind of quirky. The humor is so subtle it’s barely there. It forced me to slow down and really think about these characters; the plot is so simple you barely notice the arc. The reader knows all, yet is compelled to see how the main character will react when she finds out. This book deserves a hug!

MrsGoosesBaby3.jpgResources/Activities: This is a great book to lead a discussion on adoption, or making your own family, and how love can develop.

MrsGoosesBaby6.jpgFor more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

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PPBF: Playground

PlaygroundCoverAuthor/Illustrator: Mies van Hout
Publisher: Lemniscaat, 2015
Age: 3-6
Themes: playgrounds, imagination, animals
Opening: Let’s go to the playground! Are you coming?
Summary: (from my library catalog) Two children find many adventures on their journey to the playground.

Playground2Why I like this book: For the exciting textures, colors and compositions, the cute characters and the silliness! Just look at these spreads!

Playground4.jpgResources/Activities: Explore watercolor wash-blending, and just go play!!!

Playground6For more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

PlaygroundBack

PPBF: Daytime Visions, An Alphabet

DaytimeVisionsCoverAuthor/Illustrator: Isol
Publisher: Enchanted Lion, 2015 (adapted into Engl. by Isol and Elisa Amado)
Age: 3 and up
Themes: alphabet, feelings, color
Opening: Aa – That’s not an answer.
Summary: (from my library catalog) This alphabet book explores feelings, raises questions, and features rich, thought-provoking pictures.

DaytimeVisionsEndpapersResources/Activities: compare with other alphabet books; make your own personal alphabet book; read about Isol’s work at Picturebook Makers; visit Isol’s blog.

DaytimeVisions1Why I like this book: Simple, clever collages – all playful explorations of letters, sounds and color which will put anyone in the mindset for learning.

DaytimeVisions2For more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

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PPBF: Slug Needs a Hug

SlugNeedsAHugCover

Author: Jeanne Willis
Illustrator: Tony Ross
Publisher: Andersen Press, 2015
Age: 3 and up
Themes: slugs, affection, creativity, stories in rhyme, mother and child
OpeningOnce upon a time-y, there was a little slimy, spotty, shiny, whiny slug.
Summary: (from my library catalog) Slug worries that the reason his mother never hugs him is that he is ugly, so he follows his friends’ advice to be furry, with a beak, horns, and more, until his mother can no longer recognize him, but then he learns that she loves him, no matter what.

SlugNeedsAHugEndpapers.pngWhy I like this book: I have long been a fan of this team, and am also seldom disappointed by any of their collaborations. Fun, funny, bright, cheerful, a big bouquet of a book that does not stink. Haha! But it will charm your socks off!

SlugNeedsAHug2.jpgResources/Activities: Discuss how do we show affection and how other cultures or even animals show affection ? What are some creative ways we can show affection without physical contact?

SlugNeedsAHug3For more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

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PPBF: What to Do With a Box

WhatToDoWithABoxCoverAuthor: Jane Yolen
Illustrator: Chris Sheban
Publisher: Creative Editions, 2016
Age: 3 and up
Themes: imagination, cardboard boxes, stories in rhyme
OpeningA box! A box is a strange device.
Summary: (from my library catalog) Jane Yolen poetically reminds young readers that a simple box can be a child’s most imaginative plaything as artist Chris Sheban illustrates its myriad and magical uses.

WhatToDoWithABox1Why I like this book: I love cardboard boxes, not just because of the great memories of appliances delivered in the neighborhood and the whole gang of kids piling in and rolling down the hill, or of the multiple box pirate ship we built for my son’s birthday, but for the allure of adventure! And this book is a beautiful invitation!

WhatToDoWithABox2Resources/Activities: get a box – no instructions needed!

WhatToDoWithABox4For more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

PPBF: The Ladybug Race

LadybugRaceCoverAuthor/Illustrator: Amy Nielander
Publisher: Pomegranate Kids, 2015
Age: 3-103
Themes: insects, competition, wordless picture books
Opening: Introducing: the Versizer! The book you are holding in your hands is a marvel of squishy science. After many years of mulling and figuring, I have developed a device called the Versizer that will transform lengthy novels, myths, and epic poems into delightful nuggets of nonsense.
Summary: (from my library catalog) The plots of nine classic stories are summarized in this collection of silly verses.

LadybugRace1Why I like this book: So simple, yet so clever and so much fun! Like most kids, I like looking at bugs and these are all drawn to actual size!

LadybugRace2Resources/Activities: Perfect read for an insect unit: discuss the variety of one species, and find out which ladybug species to look for in your geographic area; search for the word ‘ladybug’ in different languages and talk about the direct translations; how are ladybugs beneficial in the garden? (I sure could use their help defending my currant bushes!)

LadybugRace3For more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

PPBF: 3 Counting Books

TwoMiceCoverAuthor/Illustrator: Sergio Ruzzier
Publisher: Clarion, 2015
Summary: review from Kirkus – HERE

One,Two:UngerercoverAuthor/Illustrator: Tomi Ungerer
Publisher: Phaidon, 2014 (first published in Gernman, Diogenes, 1973)
Summary: review from Kirkus – HERE

123BookCoverAuthor/Illustrator: R.O. Blechman
Publisher: Creative Editions, 2013
Summary: review from Kirkus – HERE

Why I like these books: I found these three in short succession, so I thought I’d share them together. Each has deceptively simple yet engaging artwork and at the same time is completely unique in content – key to a great concept book! And my personal preference – they’re all humorous! I’ve linked each for further information via their Kirkus review (above).

Resources/Activities: Read them together – or with other counting books; create your own, with drawings or photos of items from the classroom or home;

One,Two:Unger3

123Book1

For more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

PPBF: The Secret Subway

SecretSubwayCoverAuthor: Shana Corey
Illustrator: Red Nose Studio
Publisher: Schwartz&Wade, 2016
Age: 4 and up
Themes: subways, New York, Alfred E. Beach
Opening: Welcome to New York City – the greatest city on earth!
Summary: (from my library catalog) This is the astounding true story of New York City’s first and long-forgotten underground train, invented by Alfred Ely Beach in 1870

SecretSubway1Why I like this book: I love origin stories! This one makes great use of suspense to bring actual events alive and the artwork from Red Nose studio blends the perfect nostalgic sense of a silent movie with bold colors, dramatic silhouettes and humor (find the dog with wheels for back legs!)

SecretSubway3Resources/Activities: a great companion read for a unit on transportation, or in art class for sculpture or puppet making and effective use of complimentary hues in composition.

SecretSubway4For more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

SecretSubwayBackCover

PPBF: Shrunken Treasures

ShrunkenTreasuresCoverAuthor/Illustrator: Scott Nash
Publisher: Candlewick Press, 2016
Age: 5-8
Themes: classics, literature, humorous stories
Opening: Introducing: the Versizer! The book you are holding in your hands is a marvel of squishy science. After many years of mulling and figuring, I have developed a device called the Versizer that will transform lengthy novels, myths, and epic poems into delightful nuggets of nonsense.
Summary: (from my library catalog) The plots of nine classic stories are summarized in this collection of silly verses.

ShrunkenTreasures1Why I like this book: Such a fun introduction to literary classics! The bright and adorable illustrations add light-hearted amusement to these ‘shrunken’ interpretations of some heavy tales. After having analyzed a number of them in high school, I believe my adult kids would love to read these too!  (ps – in case there is a curious botanist amongst us, the late afternoon shadows grew from Cornus stolonifera, or Yellow-twig dogwood)

ShrunkenTreasures4Resources/Activities: Discuss what makes a story, poem or book a classic; draw your own favorite characters; write your own shrunken poems about favorite fairy tales or fables.

ShrunkenTreasures2.jpgFor more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

ShrunkenTreasures3