PPBF: Shrunken Treasures

ShrunkenTreasuresCoverAuthor/Illustrator: Scott Nash
Publisher: Candlewick Press, 2016
Age: 5-8
Themes: classics, literature, humorous stories
Opening: Introducing: the Versizer! The book you are holding in your hands is a marvel of squishy science. After many years of mulling and figuring, I have developed a device called the Versizer that will transform lengthy novels, myths, and epic poems into delightful nuggets of nonsense.
Summary: (from my library catalog) The plots of nine classic stories are summarized in this collection of silly verses.

ShrunkenTreasures1Why I like this book: Such a fun introduction to literary classics! The bright and adorable illustrations add light-hearted amusement to these ‘shrunken’ interpretations of some heavy tales. After having analyzed a number of them in high school, I believe my adult kids would love to read these too!  (ps – in case there is a curious botanist amongst us, the late afternoon shadows grew from Cornus stolonifera, or Yellow-twig dogwood)

ShrunkenTreasures4Resources/Activities: Discuss what makes a story, poem or book a classic; draw your own favorite characters; write your own shrunken poems about favorite fairy tales or fables.

ShrunkenTreasures2.jpgFor more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

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PPBF: Tough Guys (Have Feelings Too)

ToughGuyscoverAuthor/Illustrator: Keith Negley
Publisher: Nobrow, 2015; first publ. in England by Flying Eye, 2015
Ages: 4-7
Themes: feelings, emotions, men and emotions
Opening: It’s not always easy being a tough guy…You might not think it, but tough guys have feelings too.

ToughGuysendpapersSummary: (from my library catalog) Explains through simple text and colorful illustrations that tough guys have the same feelings as you and I.

ToughGuys1.pngWhy I like this book: It’s such a bright and attractive, bold yet simply illustrated book which compliments and leaves much room for reflecting on the simple statements on each page.

ToughGuys2.pngResources/activities: there is so much to talk about – each spread will easily invite discussion; expand upon feelings that not-so-tough guys, or strong women might have too, and how similar we all are.

ToughGuys3For existing PPBF selections including resources and activities, go to Susanna Hill’s blog: HERE, and for today’s list: HERE

ToughGuysback

PPBF: Miss Twiggley’s Tree and a winner!

Congratulations ASHLEY WOLFF! You guessed right, yet there are 2 correct guesses: fox and chicken (I’m nice like that). This is YOUR prize – a copy of my favorite picture book!

MissTwiggley'sTreecoverAuthor/Illustrator: Dorothea Warren Fox
Publisher: Purple House Press, 1966
Ages: 4-7
Themes: friendship, animals, treehouses
Opening: Funny Miss Twiggley lived in a tree with a dog named Puss and a color TV. She did what she liked, and she liked what she did, but when company came Miss Twiggley hid.

MissTwiggley'sTree1Summary: (from Amazon) Why did Miss Twiggley live in a tree? Why did she send her dog, Puss, out to do the shopping? Why did she always run away and hide when people came to visit? And it was rumored that Miss Twiggley had even more peculiar habits…

Old Miss Twiggley
Was friendly with bears.
“They shed on the sofa,” she said,
“But who cares?”

And was it true, as the mayor’s wife had heard, that she actually slept in her hat? “Simply disgraceful!” they said. But when a hurricane hits the town and the water rises, everyone is grateful to Miss Twiggley and her tree. Even better, Miss Twiggley herself learns a very important lesson, with a warm and happy ending.

MissTwiggley'sTree2This is my personal favorite. Hard to believe I can chose one, but it speaks to my heart! I found Miss Twiggley late, but it was a meeting of kindred spirits (pssst – I grew up with a willow tree in our backyard). Even after the magic of reading bedtime stories had faded, I still read this one with my big kids – sure is nice that they humor me! For those of you who know me better it is transparent – I identify strongly with the main character. Please find and read this. Let me know if you share the admiration.

MissTwiggley'sTreehalfResources/activities: Read it. Read it again!; Build a treehouse (I’d like one!); look into fostering animals from your local Humane Society; make an disaster preparedness plan 

MissTwiggley'sTree4.jpgFor existing PPBF selections including resources and activities, go to Susanna Hill’s blog: HERE

MissTwiggley'sTreeauthor

PPBF: Henny Penny (*giveaway series)

#4 in the *giveaway: please take a guess at which animal is present in all four classics. Add your guess to the comment section for a chance to win a copy of my favorite book, featured next week.

HennyPennycoverAuthor/Illustrator: Paul Galdone
Publisher: Clarion, 1968
Age: 3 and up
Themes: farm animals, panic, cumulative stories
OpeningOne day when Henny Penny was scratching among the leaves, an acorn fell out of a tree and struck her on the head.
Summary: (from my library catalog) A cumulative tale about Henny Penny and her barnyard friends who were literally outfoxed on their journey to tell the king the sky was falling.

HennyPennytitlepage copy.jpgWhy I like this book: one of my favorite classic tales, and this is the version I remember from the library at my elementary school. The colors, compositions and expressions are striking, and the story has aways made me laugh (maybe because I am known to go into an excited panic easily too!).

HennyPenny1 copy.jpgResources/Activities: Ask readers why the they think a cast of birds was chosen over any other animal; break off in groups and perform this as a skit – compare and contrast how the interpretations may differ.

HennyPenny4.jpgFor more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

HennyPennyextra copy*giveaway contest rules: find an animal that is present in all four of the classics in the series of picture books, starting with Rosie’s Walk, The Hare and the Tortoise, Over in the Meadow and Henny Penny. Mention your guess in the comment section after the fourth book is featured today, April 8th.

 

PPBF: Over in the Meadow

No foolin’! The 3rd stunner in the *giveaway series to celebrate my 4th blogiversary!OitMcoverAuthor: John Langstaff
Illustrator: Feodor Rojankovsky
Publisher: Voyager Books/Harcourt, 1957
Age: 3 and up
Themes: mothers, meadow animals, cumulative stories
OpeningOver in the meadow in the sand in the sun, lived an old mother turtle and her little turtle one.OITMtitlepage3
Summary: (from my library catalog) A presentation of an old counting rhyme about meadow animals and their activities.

OverintheMeadow4Why I like this book: This was one of my favorites to read aloud when the kids were very young, and one they learned by heart quite easily. This rhyme has been rewritten and illustrated numerous times since, with the same or with a completely different cast of characters. Some of my faves: Ezra Jack Keats, David A. Carter, Louise Voce, Jane Cabrera, and Paul Galdone.

OitM5.jpgResources/Activities: Make lists of animals and/or insects and identify some of their regular activities; Discuss where we find meadows; visit a meadow.

OitMfinalspread7.jpgFor more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

OverInTheMeadowhalftitle2*giveaway contest rules: find an animal that is present in all four of the classics in the series of picture books, starting with Rosie’s Walk. Mention your guess in the comment section after the fourth book is featured on April 8th.

PPBF: The Hare and the Tortoise

Another classic picture book in the *giveaway series to celebrate my 4th blogiversary.

H&TCoverIllustrator: Brian Wildsmith
Publisher: Oxford University Press, 1966
Ages: 3-7
Themes: hares, tortoises, fables
Opening: A hare and a tortoise were having an argument. The Hare, who could run very fast, thought he was much more clever than the tortoise, who could only move slowly and had to carry his house around on his back.

H&Ta.jpgSummary: (from goodreads) The race is on–the race, quick as lightning, against the tortoise, who not only moves slowly but carries his entire house on his back. Off they go. In a flash, the hare is yards away, flying over the grass. The tortoise has barely moved. Does he have any chance of winning?

H&T1.jpgI like this book because: not only is it a favorite fable, but it’s a stunner, then and now!

H&T3Resources/activities: research the intelligence of animals, as perceived in the past in comparison to now; what differences are there? Does one life skill trump another?

H&T4.jpgFor existing PPBF selections including resources and activities, go to Susanna Hill’s blog: HERE

*giveaway contest rules: find an animal that is present in all four of the classics in the series of picture books, starting with last week’s recommendation: Rosie’s Walk. Mention your guess in the comment section after the fourth book is featured on April 8th.

 

PPBF, my 500th post and 4th blogiversary!

To celebrate the almost 20,000 visitors and over 50,000 views, over the next weeks I will feature 4 classic favorites of mine, in which one animal is present in all four. Guess which animal and leave an entry in the comment section on April 8th.  I will pull a *winner for a copy of another favorite book…which will be featured 4 weeks from today, on April 15th! Thanks for following!

Rosie'sWalkCoverAuthor/Illustrator: Pat Hutchins
Publisher: Simon and Schuster, 1968
Ages: 3-6
Themes: farm animals, linear stories, picture book classic
Opening: Rosie the hen went for a walk

Rosie'sWalkTitlepageSummary: (from my library catalog) In this picture book, with a story told in very few words, Rosie the hen takes a walk. Although Rosie doesn’t know it, the fox is chasing her.

Rosie'sWalk2.pngI like this book because: The use of bold analogous color and array of patterns in well-balanced yet striking compositions is still fresh! The story is simple, yet enthralling. (*notice the title page sets the stage, above)

Rosie'sWalk3Resources/activities: perfect accompaniment for teaching prepositions (can you come up with more?), or analogous color harmonies; create your own Rosie’s Walk using equipment on the playground.

Rosie'sWalk4.jpgFor existing PPBF selections including resources and activities, go to Susanna Hill’s blog: HERE

Rosie'sWalkAuthor

*giveaway rules: find an animal that is present in all four of the classics in the series of picture books, starting with this week’s recommendation, Rosie’s Walk. Mention your guess in the comment section after the fourth book is featured on April 8th.

PPBF: Levi Strauss Gets a Bright Idea

LeviStraussCoverAuthor: Tony Johnston
Illustrator: Stacy Innerst
Publisher: Harcourt, 2011
Age: 4 and up
Themes: tall-tales, clothing, inventions, Gold Rush
Opening: “GOLD!” somebody yelled. Next thing anybody knew, the whoile world rushed to California and started digging up the place. The trouble was, they rushed so fats, they lost their pants.
Summary: (from my library catalog) Retells, in tall-tale fashion, how Levi Strauss went to California during the Gold Rush, saw the need for a sturdier kind of trouser, and invented jeans.

LeviStrauss1Why I like this book: I LOVE historical fiction, especially when the text makes me laugh, and the illustrations are something to marvel at. This book fits the bill!

LeviStrauss2Resources/Activities: Everyone has an old pair of jeans laying around, right? No? Well, come over and get some from me – I had grand plans for a quilt, but I don’t quilt! Try painting on fabric, maybe even add some decorative details to jeans you still wear.

LeviStrauss3For more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

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PPBF: A Crow of His Own

ACrowofHisOwnCoverAuthor: Megan Dowd Lambert
Illustrator: David Hyde Costello
Publisher: Charlesbridge, 2015
Age: 4 and up
Themes: roosters, identity, farm animals
ACrowofHisOwn1.jpgOpening: When Larry was called off to new opportunities, Sunrise Farm suddenly found itself without its prized rooster. The animals overslept and no one knew what to do.
Summary: (from my library catalog) Clyde the rooster is a little scrawny, so he is having a hard time trying to measure up to his predecessor on the farm–but with a little help from a friendly goose he may find a crow of his own.

 

ACrowofHisOwn2Why I like this book: These farm animals have such character! The text is smart, creative and engaging, and there is so much to read in the illustrations. Clyde is a new favorite protagonist!

ACrowofHisOwn4.jpgResources/Activities: discuss the responsibilities of classmates, or family members, and what would be missed if any one person were away.

ACrowofHisOwnBFor more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

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PPBF: Vincent and the Night

VincentCoverAuthor/Illustrator: Adele Enersen
Publisher: Dial Books, 2015
Ages: 2-5
Themes: bedtime, night, imagination
Opening: One evening, Vincent decided he didn’t want to go to bed.

VincentendpapersSummary: (from my library catalog) Having decided he does not want to go to sleep, Vincent unravels the blanket of night and transforms it into a cat, a lullaby, and even an elephant before finally giving in and closing his eyes.

Vincent1I like this book because: It’s cute! I love babies, books mixing photographs and line, and good use of black and white. The writing itself may not stand out, but the illustrations carry it with ease.

Vincent2Resources/activities: Use pen or yarn with photos (or magazine snippets) to create your own mixed-media artwork.

Vincent3For existing PPBF selections including resources and activities, go to Susanna Hill’s blog: HERE

Vincent4