PPBF: I Can Only Draw Worms

Author/Illustrator: Will Mabbitt
Publisher: P
enguin Workshop, 2019, orig. published by PRH UK, 2017
Age: 
3-6
Themes: worms, counting books, humorous stories 
OpeningThis is a book about worms. (I can only draw worms.)

Summary: (from my library catalog) Teaches the reader to count to ten using worms that have great adventures or everyday experiences, described but not illustrated due to the author’s inability to draw anything but worms.

I like this book because: super simple, super bright, and super funny! I’t’s simple, really! (psst, I’m still laughing!)

Resources/activities: what can you draw? Make a counting book with whatever subject you like to draw best; dig up and examine some worms, but remember to treat them well, and put them right back as soon as you’re finished! Make tissue paper worms by following instructions HERE

For more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog  HERE.

PPBF: Seven Bad Cats

9af78837-87bf-4def-a082-a1a043d20ce7Author/Illustrator: Moe Bonneau
Publisher: Sourcebooks, 2018
Age: 3-7
Themes: cats, boats, counting books
Opening: Today I put on my boots and my coat, and seven bad cats jumped into my boat.

f23bd765-6983-4588-b4ca-fefa5bec897bSummary: (from my library’s catalog) From one bad cat that eats from fish traps to seven that flip over the boat, a young girl tells, in rhyme, of an adventure at sea.

56b86a66-17b8-4ed2-adf4-d61e85c68355I like this book because: It’s delightful – best suited word I could find! Great read-aloud-ability despite near rhymes, a fun concept for a concept book, and cats! There is even an element of don’t-judge-a-book-by-it’s-cover added in for extra spice – isn’t that nice?

351a9e6f-1a64-4c3b-a25b-f9f77a781e81Resources/Activities: read a collection of counting books (like One Gorilla, a personal favorite ; use the books to look for and count items on one page that recur on others; identify the color scheme throughout the book.

124382b3-1a4e-4b42-bf02-e5753dedb1dfFor more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE

96287bb0-de59-43f9-9b45-b2672e21cf9b

PPBF: We All Count

3BAC8C1C-5334-4A90-B509-9252EC4D1A50Author/Illustrator: Julie Fleet
Publisher: Native Explore, 2014
Age: 2-7
Themes: Cree numbers, counting book, American Indian culture
Opening: see image below

4EDD33E0-1517-46E2-B657-877FC2415B81Summary: We All Count: A Book of Cree Numbers is a bilingual board book. The numbers 1-10 are presented in English and Cree with phonetic pronunciations to help young readers.

D22D7AEA-24BE-46B7-BFCA-241065CC221AWhy I like this book: I have had this one out from the library many times and could not decide if I’d like to recommend it here, only because I wondered if younger children, for whom board books are made, would be able to get as much out of it as I do. Reading it with my very young neighbor convinced me that it is indeed a PPB! I think it’s stunning as well as interesting, but my neighbor found it as engaging as I did, albeit on another level. And we read it again!

23087485-58DC-4709-8D48-BE6C2107E1C6Resources/Activities: read this interview or this interview with the author; read it with other bilingual board books, or others from the same artist!

As Thanksgiving approaches, I’d like to remind adults to contemplate the truth and the horrors of the  first Thanksgiving.

For more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

PPBF: 3 Counting Books

TwoMiceCoverAuthor/Illustrator: Sergio Ruzzier
Publisher: Clarion, 2015
Summary: review from Kirkus – HERE

One,Two:UngerercoverAuthor/Illustrator: Tomi Ungerer
Publisher: Phaidon, 2014 (first published in Gernman, Diogenes, 1973)
Summary: review from Kirkus – HERE

123BookCoverAuthor/Illustrator: R.O. Blechman
Publisher: Creative Editions, 2013
Summary: review from Kirkus – HERE

Why I like these books: I found these three in short succession, so I thought I’d share them together. Each has deceptively simple yet engaging artwork and at the same time is completely unique in content – key to a great concept book! And my personal preference – they’re all humorous! I’ve linked each for further information via their Kirkus review (above).

Resources/Activities: Read them together – or with other counting books; create your own, with drawings or photos of items from the classroom or home;

One,Two:Unger3

123Book1

For more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

PPBF: One Gorilla, A Counting Book

Author/Illustrator: Anthony Browne
Publisher: Candlewick Press, 2012
Age Level: 3-7
Themes: counting book, primates
Opening: ‘1 gorilla.’ (The suspense is killing you now, eh?)
Summary: Spoiler alert: 1 – 10, and a little extra. Okay, so there is not much of a story going on here, BUT there is, really, once you get past 10…

5baboons

Why I like this book: I don’t. I LOVE IT! The primate master is at it again! If, by some remote chance, you don’t know who Anthony Browne is, or if you’ve only read a book or two, I obviously need to fill you in. This Brit has been making picture books since the mid-seventies, been bestowed with a gazillion awards, and was the UKs Children’s Laureate from 2009-2011. Not only does he write wonderful books (about 40 now), he illustrates them. But when describing his work ‘illustrate’ is too simple a word. He breathes life into his pictures, and they breathe life back into the viewer. Stunning comes close – you do feel a bit of an electric shock, but with a strong magnetic pull. Try it.

From WILLY THE DREAMER

From WILLY THE DREAMER

‘Wise guy’ quote: (I nabbed Browne’s from a post at forbiddenplanet.co.uk) “‘I hope to encourage more children to discover and love reading, but I want to focus particularly on the appreciation of picture books, and the reading of both pictures and words. Picture books are for everybody at any age, not books to be left behind as we grow older. The best ones leave a tantalising gap between the pictures and the words, a gap that is filled by the reader’s imagination, adding so much to the excitement of reading a book.’

Resources/Activities: this counting book can easily prompt a discussion on what a primate is, their different habitats – even the different sounds each one makes – HERE is the link to a website from the National Primate Research Center at the University of Wisconsin, with a whole bunch of calls you can listen to.

For more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks go to Susanna Hill’s blog – any day