PPBF: 3 Counting Books

TwoMiceCoverAuthor/Illustrator: Sergio Ruzzier
Publisher: Clarion, 2015
Summary: review from Kirkus – HERE

One,Two:UngerercoverAuthor/Illustrator: Tomi Ungerer
Publisher: Phaidon, 2014 (first published in Gernman, Diogenes, 1973)
Summary: review from Kirkus – HERE

123BookCoverAuthor/Illustrator: R.O. Blechman
Publisher: Creative Editions, 2013
Summary: review from Kirkus – HERE

Why I like these books: I found these three in short succession, so I thought I’d share them together. Each has deceptively simple yet engaging artwork and at the same time is completely unique in content – key to a great concept book! And my personal preference – they’re all humorous! I’ve linked each for further information via their Kirkus review (above).

Resources/Activities: Read them together – or with other counting books; create your own, with drawings or photos of items from the classroom or home;

One,Two:Unger3

123Book1

For more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

#pb10for10 – fresh classics

pb 10 for 10 015

I just had to jump in, so forgive me, please, if I am not following guidelines. In the vein of ‘make new friends’, but keep the old’, here are 10 picture book gems I wouldn’t want to live without, and I hope one or two may be new to you. Of course, I’m using the label old rather loosely – a book I may have read to my now adult kids. In no particular order:

Miss Twiggley’s Tree

MissTwiggley'sTree

Brave Irene

Brave Irene

One Morning in Maine

one-morning

Tikki Tikki Tembo

TikkiTikkiTembo

 

Willy and Hughwilly-hugh

Dinner at Alberta’s

DinnerAtAlberta'sCover

 

My Little Henmylittlehen1

The Three Robbers

three-robbers

The Story of the Little Mole Who Went in Search of Whodunit*maulwurf

We read this title in German, but I prefer the direct translation: From the Little Mole Who Wanted to Know Who Pooped on His Head

Miss Rumphius

Source.Rumphius

Cathy Mere at Reflect & Refine and Mandy Robek at Enjoy and Embrace Learning organize this event. Look for the hashtag #pb10for10.

 

 

 

PPBF: Ungerer-vaganza

Today is Tomi Ungerer’s birthday and we need to celebrate!

FIcover

Publisher: Phaidon Press, 2013
Ages: 5-8yrs
Themes: children, fog, coastal/rural life
Opening: Finn and Cara were brother and sister. They lived by the sea in the back of beyond. (the opening sets the fairytale feel)
Summary: (from the publisher) No one has ever returned from the mysterious Fog Island, but when Finn and Cara get castaway on its murky shores, they discover things are not quite as they expect… Will anyone ever believe them?

FI1

Why I like this book: though written in a rather adult voice, the child in the author is definitely inviting the child in the reader with lines like these: ‘Fog Island loomed like a jagged black tooth’, ‘But to be lonesome is not a reason to get bored’, or ‘It tasted awful but felt strangely heartening’. Living in a very dry, landlocked place I miss the ocean and fog – the art in the book present a cloudy, cool and moist feel so well I can smell the salt on the air. A perfect read for a grey day – don’t forget a cup of tea!

FIfish

Resources/activities – for kids: use this book when studying a weather unit, and make fog in a jar – HERE; check out this German Kindergarten, ‘Die Katze’ designed by Tomi Ungerer and architect Ayla-Suzan Yöndel; just for adults: Check out the wonderful documentary, Far Out Isn’t Far Enough (NOT for the little uns‘): HEREvisit the Tomi Ungerer Museum: International Center for Illustration in Strasbourg (voted one of the 10 best museums in Europe by the Council of Europe); for interested adults: watch the B-movie horror film (same title, not the same content!) from 1945 (poster image below); if ever in Nantucket visit the Fog Island Cafe;

Really want to know more, don’t you! Check out the timeline on his official website – HERE; The Free Library of Philadelphia has a collection of Tomi Ungerer papersTomi Ungerer is a candidate for the 2015 Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award (ALMA) ‘The World’s Largest Children’s Literature Award’; Follow Tomi Ungerer on Facebook, or Twitter

FIboat

Here is a list (mostly) from Wikipedia of his children’s picture books (available in English), including two I have already recommended:

  • The Mellops Go Flying (1957)
  • Mellops Go Diving for Treasure (1957)
  • Crictor (1958)
  • The Mellops Strike Oil (1958)
  • Adelaide (1959)
  • Christmas Eve at the Mellops (1960)
  • Emile (1960)
  • Rufus (1961)
  • The Three Robbers (1961)
  • Snail, Where Are You? (1962)
  • Mellops Go Spelunking (1963)
  • Flat Stanley (1964) — art by Tomi Ungerer, written by Jeff Brown
  • One, Two, Where’s My Shoe? (1964)
  • Beastly Boys and Ghastly Girls (1964) — art by Tomi Ungerer, poems collected by William Cole
  • Oh, What Nonsense! (1966) — art by Tomi Ungerer, edited by William Cole
  • Orlando, the Brave Vulture (1966)
  • Warwick’s Three Bottles (1966) – with André Hodeir
  • Cleopatra Goes Sledding (1967) – with André Hodeir
  • What’s Good for a 4-Year-Old? (1967) — art by Tomi Ungerer, text by William Cole
  • Moon Man (Der Mondmann) (Diogenes Verlag, 1966)
  • Zeralda’s Ogre (1967)
  • Ask Me a Question (1968)
  • The Sorcerer’s Apprentice (1969) — text by Barbara Hazen
  • Oh, How Silly! (1970) — art by Tomi Ungerer, edited by William Cole
  • The Hat (1970)
  • I Am Papa Snap and These Are My Favorite No Such Stories (1971)
  • The Beast of Monsieur Racine (1971)
  • The Hut (1972)
  • Oh, That’s Ridiculous! (1972) — art by Tomi Ungerer, edited by William Cole
  • No Kiss for Mother (1973)
  • Allumette; A Fable, with Due Respect to Hans Christian Andersen, the Grimm Brothers, and the Honorable Ambrose Bierce (1974)
  • Tomi Ungerer’s Heidi: The Classic Novel (1997) — art by Tomi Ungerer, text by Johanna Spyri
  • Flix (1998)
  • Tortoni Tremelo the Cursed Musician (1998)
  • Otto: The Autobiography of a Teddy Bear (1999)
  • Snail, Where Are You? (2005)
  • Zloty (2009)
  • Fog Island (2013)

One more treat – the trailer to a film based on the book MOON MAN

FItitlepage

For more PPBF picks packed with resources and activities, go to Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

PPBF: Adelaide, The Flying Kangaroo

Author/Illustrator: Tomi Ungerer
Publisher: Phaidon Press, 2011 (First published in German, Diogenes, 1980)
Ages: 4-8yrs
Themes: kangaroos, flight, courage, uniqueness
Opening: Adelaide’s parents were surprised when they saw that their daughter had wings.
Summary: (from my library catalog) Adelaide, a kangaroo with wings, discovers that her unique anatomy and abilities bring her fame and fortune in Paris.

I like this book because: the story line does not follow ‘traditional’  patterns and norms,  as in escalating scenes or the protagonist having a strong hand in solving the ‘conflict’. Adelaide doesn’t see her uniqueness as a problem, she embraces it.  That was enough to satisfy me, as well as Ungerer’s ability to tell so much with so few lines. I recently watched a documentary on Ungerer, Far Out Isn’t Far Enough, and was touched by the way Maurice Sendalk spoke of him. In an article Sendak once described Ungerer’s work as passionate and personal – “it’s marvelous and it’s cuckoo and it’s that kind of veracity that’s always made for good children’s literature” (The New York Times, Sept 2011). Random tidbit: Amazon has a choking hazard warning for this book on their site! Go figure!

Resources/activitiesVintage Kid’s Books My Kid Loves posted a recommendation, and a list of Ungerer titles you might be interested in – click on any of the links for more on each book; discuss things that might make us unique, special and different from other family members or friends.

Perfect Picture Book Friday is on hiatus for the summer, but there are still plenty of selections on a themed and alphabetized list, each with teacher/parent resources, on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE

“Be different so that people can see you clearly amongst the crowds.” ― Mehmet Murat ildan

PPBF: The Three Robbers and November Challenges

Author/Illustrator: Tomi Ungerer
Publisher: Diogenes, 1963 (Die Drei Raeuber); Phaidon, 2008
Age: 4-8
Themes: robbers, orphans, girls
Opening: Once upon a time there were three fierce robbers. They went about hidden under large black capes and tall black hats.
Summary: (from Publisher’s Weekly) One bitter, black night, three ferocious highwaymen meet their match in a spunky orphan named Tiffany; Ungerer’s bold, fanciful artwork, rendered primarily in black and deep blue tones, enliven this cautionary tale of foul deeds transmogrified. (Don’t you just love it? Transmogrified!)

Why I like it: Tomi Ungerer is many an graphic designer/illustrator’s idol. Okay, one! It’s not just the clear simplicity (but that plays a BIG role!), it’s the fearlessness of his storytelling. Should three weaponed robbers evoke compassion? Nah! Do they? You betcha!

Resources/Activities: read more Ungerer!; ask children to illustrate a scene using a limited palette; check out the activities for this book from Scholastic – HERE

And it’s NOVEMBER: cold, dark, dreary.

Well, there’s Thanksgiving.

AND these challenges I signed up for – again!!!

PiBoIdMo with Tara Lazar (The Monstore, illustrated by James Burks) offers picture book writers the needed push to come up with ideas …and Sketch A Day Month with Linda Silvestri (click on images for more info)

All so we can enjoy the Holidays filled to the brim with satisfaction, and the materials to tackle the next challenge…

in 2014 with Julie Hedlund