PPBF: The Nest That Wren Built

AuthorRandi Sonenshine
Illustrator:
 Anne Hunter
Publisher: Candlewick, 2020
Age: 
3-7
Themes: wrens, nest building, stories in rhyme
Opening: These are the twigs, dried in the sun, that Papa collected one by one to cradle the nest that Wren built.

Summary: (from my library catalog) In the rhyming style of “The House That Jack Built,” this poem about the care and specificity that Carolina wrens put into building a nest is at once tender and true to life. Papa and Mama Wren gather treasures of the forest, from soft moss for a lining to snakeskin for warding off predators. Randi Sonenshine’s lilting stanzas, woven with accurate and unexpected details about Carolina wrens, and Anne Hunter’s gentle, inviting illustrations reveal the mysterious lives of these birds and impart an appreciation for the wonder of the life cycles around us. Back matter includes a glossary and additional interesting facts about wrens. Nature lovers and poetry fans alike will be drawn to this lyrical picture book depicting how Carolina wrens build a nest for their young.

I like this book because:I admit I was completely sold by the cover! And was not disappointed by the beautiful interior art at all! The is truly a perfect marriage of word and art, but the description already says it all! Definitely one of my favorites this year!

Resources/activities: try and build a nest from all the components in the book – or as many as you can find; look up the calls and songs of wrens, and maybe some other favorite birds on the Cornell Lab of Ornithology website. I used to drive my kids crazy listening on a loop! Read more books with animal stories illustrated by Anne Hunter .

For more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog  HERE. 

PPBF: The Wild Baby Goes to Sea

Author: Barbro Lindgren, translated by Jack Prelutsky
Illustrator:
 Eva Ericsson
Publisher: Greenwillow Books, 1983 (orig.1982)
Age: 
2-6
Themes: Mothers and sons, imaginations, stories in rhyme
Opening: Baby Ben was twice as wild as any other ten, there never was another child as wild as Baby Ben.

Summary: (from my library catalog) While his mother cleans house, rambunctious baby Ben sets sail in a wooden box and has many adventures.

I like this book because: the main character is just too cute! For those of us cooped up inside today, Baby Ben shows us we can still have adventures, you just need a little imaginative. Perfect book for these difficult times!

Resources/activities: get out the cardboard boxes, the laundry baskets, the pillows, blankets, and brooms! Bon voyage!

For more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog  HERE. 

PPBF: The Terrible Plop

Author: Ursula Dubosarsky
Illustrator:
 Andrew Joyner
Publisher: 
Farrar, Strauss and Giroux, 2009
Age: 
3-7
Themes: rabbits, fear, stories in rhyme
OpeningSix little rabbits down by the lake munching on carrots and chocolate cake.

Summary: (from my library catalog) When a mysterious sound sends the whole forest running away in fear, only the littlest rabbit is courageous enough to discover what really happened.

I like this book because: my storytime gang liked it as much as I did! and nothing beats when we all have fun together. It’s an energetic read-aloud, in rhyme, with plenty of humor and surprise. I like to read in a rather dramatic fashion, and this was a perfect outlet for my talents! Ha!

Resources/activities: discuss which sounds may have spooked you; would you leave chocolate cake if you were scared? (Not me!); create a puppet show based on this story – everyone can chose to be whatever animal they want, but someone must be the bear!; serve carrots and chocolate cake at the cast party!

For more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog  HERE. 

PPBF: Ogilvy

Author: Deborah Underwood
Illustrator:
 T.L. McBeth
Publisher: 
Godwin Books/Henry Holt and Co, 2019
Age: 
4-100
Themes: rabbits, clothing, sex roles, story in rhyme
OpeningOgilvy happily hopped up and down. The very fist day in a very new town .

Summary:(from my library catalog) When Ogilvy moves to a new town, he discovers that bunnies who wear dresses play ball and knit socks, and bunnies in sweaters make art and climb rocks, and Ogilvy must figure out a way to do it all.

I like this book because: it’s BRILLIANT! In a delightful yet touching way, Underwood has managed to teach such a valuable lesson without having bopped the reader(s) on the head with pedagogy! Each time I read it I find another layer too! Get your Ogilvy on!

Resources/activities: Make collage clothing for your own bunny characters; discuss what it might feel like to move to a new town (read a companion book, like Neville by Norman Juster, and or what it feels like to be pressured by others to behave in a way you might not want to; discuss empathy, tolerance and acceptance and what makes them similar, and how the are different.

For more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog  HERE. Thanks

PPBF: Danny McGee Drinks the Sea

DannyMcGeecover.jpgAuthor: Andy Stanton
Illustrator: 
Neal Layton
Publisher: 
Schwartz & Wade2016 (Orig publ. by Hodder Children’s Books, 2016)
Age: 
4-8
Themes: siblings, humorous stories, stories in rhyme
OpeningOne summer’s day, Danny and Frannie McGee hopped into a car and drove down to the sea.

DannyMcGee1Summary: (from my library catalog) When Danny’s sister doubts his boast that he can drink the entire sea, he not only proves he was right, he swallows everything else in sight.

DannyMcGee1bI like this book because: The humor and read-aloud-ability are the super-powers of this book. I really want to share it with my storytime crew, and though I wonder if the youngest might not catch some of the humor, it might just be worth trying! And summer is almost over – good time for us land-locked-lubbers! The illustrations are fun, bright and energetic, but in a few spots some interesting details are too close to the gutter – sorry I noticed at all, but hey, I notice stuff!

DannyMcGee2Resources/Activities: Read companion stories that have to do with eating, like I Know an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Pie/Jackson and Schachner, The Runaway Dinner/ Ahlberg and Ingman, Stop That Pickle!/ Armour and Shachat;discuss your favorite foods and how much could be eaten in one sitting; have a mini watermelon eating contest (not as harmful as hotdogs!)

DannyMcGee3For more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

DannyMcGeeback

PPBF: Meet the Parents

28064B5D-C96F-49CF-8E12-CC7DA68341DDAuthor: Peter Bently
Illustrator: Sara Ogilvie
Publisher: Simon & Schuster, 2014
Age: 4-8
Themes: parent-and-child, family, stories in rhyme
Opening: Sometimes you think that your mom and your dad are there just to nag you and boss you like mad.

D99449B3-0417-44FB-B7B8-24BC4E84124FSummary: (from my library catalog) Although it sometimes seems that parents are just there to boss their children around, they are also good for many other things, from mending toys, kneecaps, and clothing to telling bedtime stories.

BF19CD47-5251-40AF-8493-B67EA71F5966.jpegI like this book because: it’s a silky-smooth read aloud that will amuse the parents or caretakers as much as children. The illustrations are light and playful, yet Ogilvie has managed to pack so much emotion and tenderness into each and every face and posture!

931DF10D-F8E7-4D91-B18A-CD80F573FE18Resources/Activities: make Valentine cards of appreciation for your parents or caretakers, especially if any of the text should ring true to you!

CE5A75D5-58C3-410C-A026-854B904F0E15.jpegFor more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

 

PPBF: A Squash and a Squeeze

SquashandaSqueezeCoverAuthor: Julia Donaldson
Illustrator: Axel Scheffler
Publisher: Arthur A. Levine, 2017; first published by Methuen Books, 1993
Age: 3-6
Themes: dwellings, domestic animals, stories in rhyme, humorous stories
Opening: A little old lady lived all by herself with a table and chairs and a jug on the shelf.

SquashandaSqueezeTitlepageSummary: With the help of an old man and all of her animals, an old lady realizes that her house is not as small as she thought it was.

SquashandaSqueeze1Why I like this book: This rollicking rhyme spins an old Jewish folk tale said to be from Poland, is always fun, but made so much sweeter by the master of rhyme herself, Julia Donaldson. Scheffler is able to add so much emotion to the cozy illustrations (the goat’s face while pig raids the cupboard is priceless!), that you might want to move in with all the characters too!

SquashandaSqueezebackResources/Activities: Read about the illustrator HERE;  attempt read every single one of the author’s and illustrator’s collaborations – you won’t be sorry! Read a few more Jewish folktales, like Joseph Had a Little Overcoat, by Simms Tabak, or Such a Noise!, by Aliana Brodmann and Hans Poppel.

SquashandaSqueezeendpapers.jpgFor more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

PPBF: Things To Do

ThingsToDocoverAuthor: Elaine Magliaro
Illustrator: Catia Chien
Publisher: Chronicle, 2016
Age: 4-8
Themes: nature, activity, imagination
Opening: Things to do if you are DAWN. Shoo away night. Wash the eastern sky with light. wake the sleeping sun: Rise and shine!

ThingsToDoEndpapersSummary: (from my library catalog) Told in rhyming text, the story takes us through a child’s day, focusing on the animals and objects around the child.

ThingsToDoTitlepageWhy I like this booksoft, endearing illustrations compliment the magical text ‘like butta’, as my aunt might have said!

ThingsToDo1.jpgResources/Activities: go for a spring walk or hike, and take along some of the highlighted words in the book’s text; see how you might find something that ‘flits’, is ‘buzzy’, ‘bold’, or ‘dazzles’.

ThingsToDo2For more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

ThingsToDo3

PPBF: What to Do With a Box

WhatToDoWithABoxCoverAuthor: Jane Yolen
Illustrator: Chris Sheban
Publisher: Creative Editions, 2016
Age: 3 and up
Themes: imagination, cardboard boxes, stories in rhyme
OpeningA box! A box is a strange device.
Summary: (from my library catalog) Jane Yolen poetically reminds young readers that a simple box can be a child’s most imaginative plaything as artist Chris Sheban illustrates its myriad and magical uses.

WhatToDoWithABox1Why I like this book: I love cardboard boxes, not just because of the great memories of appliances delivered in the neighborhood and the whole gang of kids piling in and rolling down the hill, or of the multiple box pirate ship we built for my son’s birthday, but for the allure of adventure! And this book is a beautiful invitation!

WhatToDoWithABox2Resources/Activities: get a box – no instructions needed!

WhatToDoWithABox4For more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

PPBF: The Piggy in the Puddle

The PPBF series on Susanna Hill’s blog is still taking a vacation, but I have to share Perfect Picture Books as discover them, at least on Fridays!PiggyCoverAuthor: Charlotte Pomerantz
Illustrator: James Marshall
Publisher: Simon and Schuster, 1974
Ages: 3-8
Themes: pigs, mud, stories in rhyme
Opening: See the piggy,/ See the puddle,/ See the muddy little puddle,/ See the piggy in the middle/ Of the muddy little puddle.
Summary: (from my library catalog) Unable to persuade a young pig from frolicking in the mud, her family finally joins her for a mud party.

Untitled 2I like this book because: my inner-kindergartener yelled, “More! More!” while I read aloud with runaway energy! Another classic gem I was glad to be able to get a hold of through my inter-library loan system. The art is pure Marshall: subtle, hysterical, effective!

PiggyMomResources/activities: discuss why pigs like to wallow in mud, and possibly other seemingly strange habits of animals; instructions to make pig finger puppets at ichild – HERE; make a list of words that rhyme with PIG.

PiggyBackFor existing PPBF selections including resources and activities, go to Susanna Hill’s blog: HERE