PPBF: Our Car

BCC3A07E-CBC6-453F-BE02-2644E9E80458Author: J.M. Brum
Illustrator: 
Jan Bajtlik
Publisher: 
Roaring Brook Press, 2018
Age: 
2-6
Themes: cars, toys, imagination
OpeningOur car is as red as a fire engine.

6B86FB8E-9A9C-4415-9EDB-EB75D493BEE0Summary: (from my library catalog) A child describes the family car, which is as red as a fire engine, and is driven by his father through wind, snow, and all seasons.

45025787-AFDD-475F-967C-610229365D8BI like this book because: It’s so simple (yeah, you know me!), fun, elegant and a great aid in teaching small bodies with big minds about reading pictures! I brought this book to my regular coffee date with ‘old’ folks (me and my friends!) and everyone picked it up to look at of their own accord, laughed, smiled, and said, “So cute!” Perfect holiday gift for a young friend. And yes, Virginia, even grown-ups enjoy great picture books!

2AC128D6-0224-47F3-97CC-DF1F0C2EF43EResources/Activities: draw with oil pastels on dark paper for a night-time ‘ride’; recreate the car images with chalk on sidewalks; act out the story with toy cars; make a map on a large piece of paper where your toy cars can roam; create your own toy car out of a cardboard box and ‘race’ your friends!

84FC066F-BA5D-4A6A-8D47-008ADEC0FA69For more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

Advertisements

PPBF: Steadfast Tin Soldier

BF4E6FA6-4C03-493F-B876-7639EF42B552Author: Hans Christian Andersen/Joohee Yoon
Illustrator: 
Joohee Yoon
Publisher:
Enchanted Lion Books, 2016
Age: 4
-8
Themes: Toys, fairytales
OpeningOnce there were five and twenty tin soldiers, all of them brothers, being made from the same tin spoon.

40DC6820-6B08-4358-AD9C-58B4394C3A66Summary: (from my library catalog) The perilous adventure of a toy soldier who loves a paper dancing girl culminates in tragedy for both of them.

50418E2F-E08A-4019-BA19-EFC8A307EE0CI like this book because: I love fairytales, especially around the holidays – nostalgia? – and this is such a beautiful version! The text is also more palatable for younger ears, but together with the illustrations this is a book that multiple ages can enjoy together.

F61D2F46-EC28-46A3-8466-4601A17ACBD0Resources/Activities: create art using just two colors, or one color and black; read more fairytales together! I find that winter-break was always a good time to bake, read, drink tea or hot cocoa, and just enjoy being together.

F18CF510-F6D6-44C1-B511-02C4BA7FDDF4For more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE

A17B5289-630C-4DCB-BCAF-19C4592BE6C4

PPBF: Clown

ClownCoverAuthor/Illustrator: Quentin Blake
Publisher: Henry Holt and Company, 1995
Ages: 3-8yrs
Themes: wordless stories, toys, home
Summary: (from my library catalog)After being discarded, Clown makes his way through town having a series of adventures as he tries to find a home for himself and his other toy friends.

Clown1

I like this book because: I too have once been discarded (some friendships just don’t last), and immediately found myself able to empathize with Clown and understand his struggle to feel secure again. I’m glad he didn’t give up either! Yeah, it made me a little weepy, but happy too! I’ve been on a Quentin Blake spree, reading books he has illustrated and/or written, biography materials and interviews too. Whew – it’s been a fun and enlightening ride! He also helped establish the House of Illustration, a home for the art of illustration. Read more on Blake’s exhibit there- HERE, or a visit to the museum by kid-lit author Pippa Goodhart from the Picture Book Den blog – HERE

Clown2

Resources/activities: this is a great book to read when discussing emotions, understanding them, learning the difference between sympathy and empathy, as well as character traits like perseverance. One could also touch on hygiene and why it would be a good thing to clean toys found in the trash before we use (and love!) them.

Clownspot4

For more PPBF selections including resources and activities, go to Susanna Hill’s blog: HERE

Clown4

Check out the red button in the sidebar – yes, that one. Click it. Now go make your own – HERE