My Books Released! And a Tandem

My books released! Early! As a newbie I am learning (check Amazon for release dates!). Lucky for me I had friends to toast with that evening!

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Click on the image to link to this page on the Bailiwick Press site.

It’s Thanksgiving Day in Canada and Columbus Day in the U.S., so Catherine Johnson and I are using the holidays as prompts for a tandem post (words/doodles). BUT I don’t celebrate Columbus Day, though I do remember the day off from school fondly! Every year we’d pack the family and a few neighborhood kids into the station wagon and head north for leaf peeping, picnicking and cave crawling in Connecticut’s oldest state park: Putnam Memorial in Redding (see image below).

Click on the image for more info on Putnam Memorial State Park

It was the highlight of autumn, my favorite season.

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For more on the new books: Carrie Charley Brown invited me to be her Mystery Guest tomorrow on Carrie On…Together!, and that includes a GIVEAWAY – HERE

Not So Random Tandem and Fish for Supper

Catherine Johnson is writing a poem (HERE), prompt word ‘lighthouse’ (in cahoots with Jody Hedlund’s lighthouse series) and I doodled these images, because sometimes we like to push each other around, I mean, to motivate each other. But my lighthouse just would not come on it’s own. Finally a lighthouse keeper appeared…then a cat. I’m interested to see what will happen next!

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Now for a PPBF selection (yes, I know Susanna’s blog is on vacation, but I can’t help myself – love sharing great picture books!).

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Author/Illustrator: M.B. Goffstein
Publisher: Dial Press, 1976
Ages: 4-8yrs
Themes: humorous stories, grandmothers, retired life
Opening: When my grandmother went fishing, she would get up at five o’clock in the morning, and make herself breakfast,…
Summary/I like this book because: (from my library catalog) “Describes Grandmother’s typical day of fishing.” What? I think that was the shortest off-the-wall summary I’ve found yet! Let me do a little ‘splainin’. I didn’t have a single selection for today in my book bag. I picked this one off the shelf, that one of my kids chose as the elementary school library was getting rid of a slew of too well-loved books, to make room for new ones. I read it again, thought, this is not really a story that would be considered publishable today (no complication, no resolution), but it grabbed me, like a one-liner sticks long after you’ve left the scene. So, I googled, and found that this little smirk won a Caldecott Honor in 1977, and that this author I had not otherwise read (surprising only because I was averaging 100/wk for yrs), is famous – AND has a fabulous quirky website – HERE.

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Resources/activities: check out M.B. Goffsteins’ post: How to Write and Illustrate a Picture Book. Now. HERE

Fish2You can still head over to Susanna’s blog for a wonderful list of titles with resources. She keeps the back door unlocked!

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Many men go fishing all of their lives without knowing that it is not fish they are after. -Henry David Thoreau

 

 

 

 

Tandem with Karyn

Karyn and I got to chatting about inventors and decided to do a tandem post (art and poetry) on George Washington Carver. Go to Karyn’s blog HERE to check out what Karyn put together!

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George Washington Carver is well known for his discovery of 300 uses for the peanut. His work helped save the livelihoods of many farmers struggling to make use of soil depleted of nutrients from years and years of cotton-farming. And George was more: a botanist, a researcher, an inventor and teacher; he started his career studying art and music.

But first he was a boy, born into slavery, who yearned for an education. From his own account, as a young boy he traveled 10 miles to get to a school he was allowed to attend. A woman he met there, Mariah Watkins, told him something that would shape his life – “You must learn all you can, then go back out into the world and give your learning back to the people.” And these are the words I imagined him listening to while drawing the silhouette above.

And I imagined what he might say, years later:

Those words fed me. They skimmed along the lobes and slipped into my ear, my brain, my heart. I hungered for knowledge and took what I got. I digested it. From those words, I fed all that I could.

This post is the perfect excuse to share a favorite song: