PPBF: Baabwaa and Wooliam

613D8E24-C27E-4BA4-B08B-20809849FD25Author: David Elliott
Illustrator: Melissa Sweet
Publisher: Candlewick, 2018
Age: 4-8
Themes: sheep, wolves, reading, knitting

593745FA-8F00-4D57-8EAA-DB9DCDB0EB72Opening: This is Wooliam. He is a sheep. You will note that Wooliam is reading. There are not many sheep who read. But Wooliam is one of them.

92119E42-52B6-47F4-B93C-70532F2BF02DSummary: (from the publisher): Baabwaa is a sheep who loves to knit. Wooliam is a sheep who loves to read. It sounds a bit boring, but they like it. Then, quite unexpectedly, a third sheep shows up. A funny-looking sheep who wears a tattered wool coat and has long, dreadfully decaying teeth. Wooliam, being well-read, recognizes their new acquaintance: the Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing! The wolf is so flattered to discover his literary reputation precedes him that he stops trying to eat Baabwaa and Wooliam. And a discovery by the sheep turns the encounter into an unexpected friendship.

8936AC7D-D8DE-45FC-9161-63D2A61E358AI like this book because:The whimsical watercolor-collages are cheerful and satisfying, as I always note them to be in Melissa Sweet’s books, but this time I am especially enjoying the character designs. I want to camp out with these three! But the storytelling! Ahh! It’s the sort I might call cheeky if I new exactly how the British apply the word. In any case it takes me back to stories I’ve read to my children just before they started reading early chapter books on their own, where they had more patience and could soak up all the goodness of a well-layered sense of humor. Have I sold you yet?

8E1409D8-30B4-4EB3-8A4F-246D98B9FFBFResources/Activities: read a book, learn to knit a scarf (check out THIS video), then head out on an adventure – birdsong included. Pack a lunch to take along, unless you like eating grass; make a map of where you’ve been, like the one on page 8; read multiple wolf-themed books so you too can recognize one when you see it! Make a sheep craft, like the one below – more info HERE.

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For more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

PPBF: Louis I, King of the Sheep

LouisIcoverAuthor/Illustrator: Olivier Tallec
Publisher: Enchanted Lion, 2015; originally published in France by Actes Sud, 2014; translation Claudia Zoe Bedrick
Age: 5-9
Themes: kings, rulers, sheep, power
Opening: And so it was one windy day that Louis the sheep thereby became Louis I, King of the Sheep.
Summary: (from my library’s catalog) When a crown lands at Louis the sheep’s feet, he crowns himself king of the sheep, imagining just what kind of a king he would be.

LouisItitlepageWhy I like this book: It’s funny yet great food for thought for young people about authority and power and it’s place in our present world. Thew illustrations are sumptuous, yet the cartoon-style characters are totally suited to their rich surroundings. And if you are familiar with other Tallec books, you might recognize some characters (do read, Who Done It?, Chronicle Books, 2015)!

 

LouisI1.jpgResources/Activities: imagine what you might like to do as king; look into the reality of monarchies today; do kingdoms exist in the wild animal world?; would you like to live in a kingdom?

 

LouisI2.jpgFor more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

 

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PPBF: The Sheep of the Lal Bagh

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My well-loved 2nd-hand copy

Author: David Mark
Illustrator: Lionel Kalish
Publisher: Parents’ Magazine Press, 1967
Ages: 4-8yrs
Themes: sheep, India, modernization
Opening: In a little city in the heart of India there was a big park called Lal Bagh.
Summary: (from my library catalog) A sheep lives in a special park in India and nibbles the grass in decorative designs until he is replaced by a lawnmower.

I like this book because: not only are the illustrations killer, but the story is so sweet! A wonderful tale of appreciating the natural world and creatures, as well as an willingness to accept modernization – preferably in moderation! Gentle and welcome repetition round things out nicely too. If you don’t know this book already it’s bound to become a favorite!

Resources/activities: if you enjoy Kalish’s art, check out Tina Kugler’s pinterest boardHERE; this would make a good supplement to teaching about other countries around the world for K-3rd grade; learn about the history of sheep and lawncare in America – HERE.

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Perfect Picture Book Friday is on hiatus for the summer, but there are still plenty of selections on a themed and alphabetized list, each with teacher/parent resources, on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE

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Gorgeous endpapers!