Day 6 #picturebookpicnic giveaway

LOUIS will be celebrating World Picnic Day with picnics and his picture book friends – and stuffies – all WEEK! I’ll post pictures on Instagram where anyone (in the US) can comment – on any of the week’s posts – for a chance to win. Deadline is Thursday, 6/24/21 12pm MDT. Winner will be announced on the next Perfect Picture Book Friday!

Today’s stuffie-guests are Walross, Komodo, Pooh, Wolfie, H. Hog and his elephant and horse, McEelface, and Elk! Activities to freshen up and cool down on this HOT day: sprinkler hop, book swap, ice pop, and sofa flop!

Bubbles…UP!, by Jacqueline Davies and illus. by Sonia Sánchez, Katherine Tegen, 2021: A day at the community pool is full of underwater magic–dunking and diving with friends, somersaulting, walking on your hands, and bursting up through the surface like a tortoise. But when a thunderstorm comes and a little brother ventures too close to the pool’s edge, will our main character be quick enough and brave enough to save the day?

I’m a Hare, So There!, by Julie Rowan-Zoch, HMH, 2021: (shameless!) An exasperated hare and plucky (ground!) squirrel engage in a battle of wits to determine who’s who in this hilarious author-illustrator debut for fans of I Yam a Donkey and Grumpy Monkey.

The True Tale of a Giantess, by Anne Renaud and illus. by Marie Lafrance, Kids Can Press, 2018: Anna Swan lived an inspiring life as big as she was, filled with fame, wealth, world travel and true love. In this thoroughly researched picture book biography, Anne Renaud uses playful and rhythmic language and first-person storytelling to perfectly capture the essence of this unique woman’s uplifting life. (*snippet from amazon description)

Fox & Chick: The Sleepover: and Other Stories, by Sergio Ruzzier, Chronicle, 2021: In three stories, Fox comforts Chick on a sleepover, helps Chick hang a painting, and throws Chicks a surprise birthday party.

*Book descriptions form my library’s catalog.

AND LOUIS is on SALE right now on Amazon: HEREDon’t forget to enter by commenting for the GIVEAWAY on my Instagram page: @jrzoch

I think Wolfie fell asleep – too many cupcakes!

Day 5 #picturebookpicnic giveaway

LOUIS will be celebrating World Picnic Day with picnics and his picture book friends – and stuffies – all WEEK! I’ll post pictures on Instagram where anyone (in the US) can comment – on any of the week’s posts – for a chance to win. Deadline is Thursday, 6/24/21 12pm MDT. Winner will be announced on the next Perfect Picture Book Friday!

Back in a secluded spot in the garden in honor of Miss Olivia’s birthday (see photo in the photo)! Invited stuffies: Livvy’s dragon, Livvy’s horse, Livvy’s birdie and kangaroo! LOUIS picked all the books for their splash of red on the cover (wonder why?!) and the book Olivia had wanted read over, and over, and over!

Ada’s Ideas, by Fiona Robinson, Harry N. Abrams, 2016: A picture book biography of mathematician Ada Lovelace, the first computer programmer, by the award-winning author/illustrator Fiona Robinson

Hello, Lighthouse, by Sophie Blackall, Little Brown, 2018: Explores the life of one lighthouse as it beams its message out to sea through shifting seasons, changeable weather, and the tenure of its final keeper.

Go Show the World, by Wab Kinew illus. by Joe Morse, Tundra, 2018: Go Show the World is a tribute to historic and modern-day Indigenous heroes, featuring important figures such as Tecumseh, Sacagawea and former NASA astronaut John Herrington. Celebrating the stories of Indigenous people throughout time, Wab Kinew has created a powerful rap song, the lyrics of which are the basis for the text in this beautiful picture book, illustrated by the acclaimed Joe Morse. Including figures such as Crazy Horse, Net-no-kwa, former NASA astronaut John Herrington and Canadian NHL goalie Carey Price, Go Show the World showcases a diverse group of Indigenous people in the US and Canada, both the more well known and the not- so-widely recognized. Individually, their stories, though briefly touched on, are inspiring; collectively, they empower the reader with this message: “We are people who matter, yes, it’s true; now let’s show the world what people who matter can do”

Noah, Noasaurus, by Elaine Kiely Kearns and illus. by Colin Jack, Albert Whitman, 2019: Noah is in a grumpy mood and wants to be alone, but when his friends follow him around he cannot help but have fun.

A Porcupine Named Fluffy, Helen Lester, illus. by Lynn Munsinger, HMH, 1989: A porcupine named Fluffy is happier with his name after he meets a similarly misnamed rhinoceros.

*Book descriptions form my library’s catalog.

AND LOUIS is on SALE right now on Amazon: HEREDon’t forget to enter by commenting for the GIVEAWAY on my Instagram page: @jrzoch

PPBF: The Five of Us

2210EB5B-FCD5-4352-9F60-EEF6375CF4E7Author/Illustrator: Quentin Blake
Publisher: Tate Publishing, 2014
Age: 4-8
Themes: abilities, friendship, road trip
Opening: Once, not very long ago, and not very far from here, there were fve friends. There names were Angie, Ollie, Simona, Mario and Eric. They were all fantastic.

65D4A18E-66C0-4D2B-A3B6-1B20BD28BCEESummary: (from the author’s website) THE FIVE OF US is a captivating tale of adventure, friendship and teamwork: Angie, Ollie, Simona, Mario and Eric are five fantastic friends, each of whom has an unusual ability. Disaster strikes on a day out to the countryside but, working together and combining their individual powers, the Fantastic Five save the day. Teeming with Quentin Blake’s characteristic sense of fun and his exuberant illustrations, THE FIVE OF US is also a powerful, though subtle, reminder that the world is a better place when we focus on what we can do, rather than on what we can’t.

5B00E4BC-FC82-4E38-AD6C-DFC459A799C4I like this book because: I was actually on the hunt for counting books when I came upon this Blake title I had not yet read (I believe I have read most of his authored books…but happy to find out I haven’t!). The story is so simple yet powerful, and as usual the drawings lively and loose – just the way I like ’em! But read this for the heart. It reminds us how much  we can accomplish with our own special quirks if we put them to good use!

7FF57797-7183-4556-9E54-C6F2FC4EB9F8Resources/Activities: For more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

78A3F62D-3D7B-42C6-832E-A217D8DCF592

WIX: Bring to the Table

Food for thought: Recently a friend mentioned that her Alma Mater had once renamed a celebratory picnic because of the word’s origin. The reason? It’s alleged ties to the slave trade. I was dumbfounded! Never had I heard this before! I asked if she had checked it’s etymology and she hadn’t – she believed that if an institution of higher learning were to go that far it must be true. I have been astonished by the truth behind word origins before, but this one ate at me. So I dug in!

Wikipedia does not mention such a connotation at all, but traces the word back to the 1692 edition of Tony Willis, Origines de la Langue Française. Marking the first appearance of the word in print, it mentions pique-nique as a term “used to describe a group of people dining in a restaurant who brought their own wine. The concept of a picnic long retained the connotation of a meal to which everyone contributed something.”

So what frightened university officials? A claim had spread on the internet that picnic was a shortening of ‘pick a nigger’ and referred to an outdoor gathering where families enjoyed boxed lunches while a randomly chosen black man was hanged.

A research fellow in African-American Studies at the Smithsonian, Dr. Alonzo Smith, has debunked this in detail, including the following comments:

To attempt to tie lynchings to family outings, where food was served, is to misunderstand the real nature of these events. Rather, they were outbreaks of mass white hysteria, and attempts by groups of Whites to terrorize and brutalize the entire Black communities where they occurred. Often, they were motivated by alleged acts of violence by Blacks against Whites, alleged disrespect and other breaches of Southern racial “etiquette,” and on many occasions, victims were chosen at random. Although women and children were frequently present, it is more accurate to view these events as collective psychotic behavior, rather than family outings.

I take great pleasure in words and their connotations, as well as a good potluck. What do you bring to the table?