PPBF: The Teeny-Tiny Woman

B6820DF0-0D0C-44BE-AED7-02ECDB326454Author/Illustrator: Paul Galdone
Publisher: Houghtoin Mifflin, 1984
Age: 4-7
Themes: folklore, bones, scary stories
Opening: Once upon a time there was a teeny-tiny woman who lived in a teeny-tiny house in a teeny-tiny village.

73D84345-E247-4653-80CC-0D54882D02E4Summary: (from my library’s catalog) Retells the tale of the teeny-tiny woman who finds a teeny-tiny bone in a churchyard and puts it away in her cupboard before she goes to sleep.

3CB0CE98-617F-4460-AA52-4CDF12E3B4B2I like this book because: It’s a teeny-tiny classic, a re-telling of a folktale that has just the right amount of silly in just the right amount of spooky for not so teeny-tiny kids! The illustrations are cute but not too cute too! And it’s so much fun to read aloud – a priority for me!

2B1B158D-6EBB-4D30-8FA5-8DF57652FCE2Resources/Activities: read this at Halloween or at a sleep-over, or on a dark, rainy afternoon; along with other slightly scary titles like A Creepy Pair Of Underwear/A.Reynolds and P.Brown, Big Bad Bunny/Franny Billingsley and G.Brian Karas

5A83BB81-78B9-4E29-B1D4-57E9CC196556For more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE

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PPBF: Anatole

AnatoleCoverAuthor: Eve Titus
Illustrator: Paul Galdone
Publisher: McGraw-Hill, 1956
Age: 4-8
Themes: mice, cheese, fairness
OpeningIn all France there was no happier, more contented mouse than Anatole.

AnatoletitlepageSummary: (from my library catalog) A French mouse decides to earn an honest living by tasting the cheese in a cheese factory and leaving notes about its quality.

Anatole1Why I like this book: Looks like I am sort of stuck in the past again (will try better next time)! I love the limited color palette set against the black and white ink-wash and Galdone’s loose yet confident style, illustrating a sweet classic story of a French mouse on a mission to change!

Anatole3.pngResources/Activities: come up with a secret way to make someone else’s life or lives better without looking for recognition, like leaving flowers on a doorstep, or mowing someone’s lawn while they are out – or even sending a secret note to make someone smile!

Anatole2For more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

Anatole

PPBF: The Little Red Hen

LRHcoverAuthor/Illustrator: Paui Galdone
Publisher: Clarion, 1973
Ages: 3-7yrs
Themes: folk tale, animals, just rewards
Opening: Once upon a time a cat and a dog and a mouse and a little red hen all lived together in a cozy little house.
Summary: (from my library catalog)The little red hen finds none of her lazy friends willing to help her plant, harvest, or grind wheat into flour, but all are eager to eat the cake she makes from it.

DSC01146I like this book because: it is the didactic tale we all know, but what I like is that the hen does not give in, and that leads into the discussion of right and wrong so much better than versions where the hen decides to share. But who is kidding who here? I chose it for the illustrations! Specifically for the character designs and the way Galdone lends emotion to the character’s faces and postures, making visual reading so much fun!

LRH3Resources/activities: bake bread; make pretend/playdough bread using rolling pins; try assorted breads in class – have a taste test.

LRH5For more PPBF selections including resources and activities, go to Susanna Hill’s blog: HERE

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