PPBF: Go Away, Big Green Monster!

GoAway,BigGreenMonster!CoverAuthor/Illustrator: Ed Emberley
Publisher: Little Brown, 1993, 2005
Age: 4-7
Themes: monsters, fear, toy books
Opening: Big Green Monster has two big yellow eyes,
Summary: (from my library catalog) Die-cut pages through which bits of a monster are revealed are designed to help a child control nighttime fears of monsters.

GoAway,BigGreenMonster!1Why I like this book: Simple concept, visually inviting, and so much fun – no spoilers! Great inspiration for pumpkin carving crowds.

GoAway,BigGreenMonster!2Resources/Activities: Draw your own monsters; what features will your monster have that differ from this one?

GoAway,BigGreenMonster!3For more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

PPBF: Two Emberlys Times Two

DrummerHofcoverAuthor: adapted by Barbara Emberly
Illustrator: Ed Emberly
Publisher: Simon & Schuster, 1967
Age: Amazon says 6-9, I say younger!
Themes: cannons, war, folk songs
Opening: Drummer Hof fired it off.
Summary: (from my library catalog) A cumulative folk song in which seven soldiers build a magnificent cannon, but Drummer Hoff fires it off.

DrummerHof4Why I like this book: Folk songs are treasures and I am so grateful that these two picturebook makers have been able to bring them to life with careful pacing and an extraordinary mixture of trippy 60’s and Colonial elements. We could call it Colonial Punk! As fresh and juicy now as they were 50 – FIFTY!! – years ago.

DrummerHof2Resources/Activities: read the folk verse from which the text book was adapted HERE; discuss the clothing and how it differs from uniforms today.DrummerHof3

Beauty x 2 (x2!):

OneWideRivercoverAuthor: Adapted by Barbara Emberly
Illustrator: Ed Emberly
Publisher: first piublished, 1966; First Ammo edition, 2014
Age: 3 and up
Themes: animals, Noah’s Ark, folk songs
OpeningOld Noah built and ark, he built it out of hick’ry bark.
Summary: (from my library catalog) An adaptation of the folksong classic is presented as a counting story about Noah’s Ark and is complemented by silhouette woodcut illustrations.

OneWideRivertitlepage.jpgWhy I like this book: uncomplicated and accessible illustrations propelled by bold background color – need I say more?

OneWideRiver1.jpgResources/Activities: make potato prints with black paint on colored construction paper; discuss why saving life from extinction is important; watch the book trailer HERE; listen to the recording from The Country Gentlemen.

 

OneWideRiver2For more Perfect Picture Book picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

PPBF: Ed Emberley’s Halloween Drawing Book

With Halloween creeping up this PPB is ripe for the carving!
Author/Illustrator: Ed Emberley
Publisher: Little, Brown and Company, 1980
Genre: non-fiction
Themes: Halloween, drawing
Age Level: For anyone who says they can’t draw!
Opening: If you can draw these simple shapes (triangle, circle, square, etc.) there’s a good chance that you will be able to draw at least most of the things in this book. Step-by-step instructions show you how.
Synopsis: (From Amazon) Using simple shapes, Ed Emberley shows would-be artists how to draw a variety of creepy and scary Halloween creatures, such as witches, bats, monsters, and more! This book is packed with cool things that kids-and not a few adults-really want to draw. Easy and fun, the book provides hours of art-full entertainment.
Why I like this book: I have not seen the revised edition, but I hope it is as simple and fun as the original; Emberley really broke the process down to the basics, and made it easy to figure out how to draw just about anything! And as a former art teacher I truly appreciate giving kids simple yet perfect tools to succeed.
Resource/Activity: Get out your pencils, markers and paper and DRAW! Emberley has written many other drawing books: Make A World, Animals, Fingerprints, Weirdos, Faces, Trucks and Trains – the list goes on!

For more posts on Perfect Picture Books and resources visit Susanna Hill’s blog every Friday