PPBF: Harold Snipperpot’s Best Disaster Ever

29E7344E-406B-4FDC-B643-40D76A24DE5AAuthor/Illustrator: Beatrice Alemagna
Publisher: Harper, 2019
Age: 4-8
Themes: birthdays, parties, animals
Opening: Some days feel like complete disasters. You feel turned upside down, and it seems impossible anything good can happen.

307EA56D-8553-4693-989B-D0EDFEDCCDCESummary: (from my library’s catalog) Lonely seven-year-old Harold Phillip Snipperpot is excited when his parents, not known for their affection, throw him a birthday party attended exclusively by animals, but things take a turn when his guests start destroying the house, forcing Harold to try and save his party from calamity with surprising results.

3307DA77-1AE4-4CFC-AA4A-282642D8369AI like this book because: I love the underlying theme: sometimes unimaginable disaster can spark positive change. Adults are far more frightened of change or the unknown than children are, and I love how this book bursts through to prove it! Oh, and by the way, the illustrations are exquisite.

0C816DEE-7765-4083-8D87-30F499BE2EEEResources/Activities: Watch this interview with Beatrice Alemagna; discuss experiences where one may have thought the worst had happen while going through it, yet some outcome or change might have had positive aspects – like missing a bus and therefore an important appointment, but bumping into an old friend because you missed the bus!; visit the zoo for a ‘safe’ encounter with animals spotted in this book; think about what kind of animals you would like to invite to your own birthday!

3A0B7762-EB15-4FA4-8552-D997C39760E3For more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE

PPBF: Bookmaker’s Studio

TheBookmaker'sStudioCoverAuthor: Photography: Jake Green; Art Direction: Melanie Mues; Editor: James Cartwright
Publisher: The Bookmaker’s Studio, 2015; Printers: Hacksmith Press
Ages: all
Themes: children’s picture book illustrators, illustration, design
Opening/Introduction: Making books for kids is a humbling profession; months and years of character developing, story refining, composition adjusting, and dummy approving to which your audience will be forever indifferent.
TheBookmaker'sStudio1

TheBookmaker'sStudio2Summary: (from the kickstarter page) A glimpse inside the studios and minds of some of the world’s best living children’s picturebook makers. A limited edition photo book.

TheBookmaker'sStudioInhaltI supported this kickstarter project because: I am curious, nosy, interested and delighted to have a glimpse into the working spaces of other artists. TheBookmaker'sStudio3

TheBookmaker'sStudio4Resources/activities: Have children list all the things they recognize in the artist’s studios as tools they know or own themselves, then make a second list of things they are surprised to see in an artist’s studio; Discuss how picture books are made.

TheBookmaker'sStudio5For existing PPBF selections, including resources and activities, go to Susanna Hill’s blog: HERE; for todays’ fresh picks, click HERE

TheBookmaker'sStudioBack

 

PPBF: A Lion in Paris

LionCover

Author/Illustrator: Beatrice Alemagna [English translation by Rae Walter]
Publisher: Tate Publishing, First published in French by Autrement, 2006; Engl. edition 2014
Ages: 3-8yrs
Themes: lions, paris, statues
Opening: He was a big lion. A young, curious and lonely lion. He was bored at home on the grasslands, and so one day he set off to find a job, love and a future.
Summary: (from Amazon) “A lion … bored by his rural life in the savanna, seeks excitement and opportunity in the City of Light. Upon arriving in Paris, the lion is disappointed to find that despite his size, people barely pay attention to him, not even when he lets out a ferocious roar on the busy underground Métro”

LionInterior1

I like this book because: of the art. Hands down. Don’t get me wrong, I enjoyed the story, but I almost feel the words were superflous. The art is so powerful, so full of energy, whimsy and detail (deserving of the thick paper used in the making) and left me thinking about them all day. I am so glad the size (15 x 11.3 inches) is large enough to accommodate, and I wonder if the the vertical opening was necessary for the image below, but having neck and shoulder problems I would have appreciated a horizontal format (selfish!). This is a must-read for all budding artists!

LionInterior2Resources/activities: learn about a local statue in your town/city and it’s history; create stories for statues about how they might have found their resting spot; make pap-mâché statues after watching a tutorial – HERE.

Perfect Picture Book Friday is still on hiatus for the summer (back in 2 weeks!), but there are still plenty of selections on a themed and alphabetized list, each with teacher/parent resources, on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.