PPBF: Look!

D3BFCDEB-F76D-4604-A646-1051455DEB1DAuthor/Illustrator: Fiona Woodcock
Publisher: Greenwillow , 2018
Age: 3-7
Themes: double-letter words, spelling, concept books
OpeningFood.

36EB1BED-A5B0-4B65-A89A-81B37F2EB7B2Summary: (from my library’s catalog) A brother and sister spend an exciting day at the zoo where they find balloons, baboons, kangaroos, and more. Told entirely through illustrations and single words containing a double “O”.

55E63D2A-4826-4A44-880A-4157CE5B0F68I like this book because: It’s beautifully and cleverly illustrated, with just enough texture and detail to keep you looking at each detail on each page, and yet the concept is soo simple! Just LOOK!

E977BA4F-1BBA-4745-94F4-A7EE7868200AResources/Activities: Play a Guess My Rule game I learned from watching Zoom as a kid, which can be expanded upon – HERE; What other words do you know that have double letters?

08C8D2C1-57FB-4741-9B34-5FE5323A75F5For more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERECB508097-CC96-4CF5-8850-2A8B6D1BBB57

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PPBF: My Family Tree and Me

6922A63A-2A78-49D5-8D15-7632EAEECFEAAuthor/Illustrator: Dušan Petričić
Publisher: Kids Can Press , 2015
Age: 5+
Themes: family, genealogy, concept books
OpeningA long, long, time ago there lived my great-great-grandfather and mygreat-great-grandmother.

CABA14B5-BC71-42B4-B160-65CF11B8AB73Summary: (from my library’s catalog) Come explore a boy’s family tree one side at a time, starting from the front of his photo album and then starting from the back–and see how they come together in the middle!

00F3DF28-8C80-4216-ADF4-EC2731EA5D46I like this book because: of the nifty idea to have the two (family) sides come together in the middle! AND it’s sooooo beautifully rendered! You might remember Petričić’s illustrations for another wonderful book: The Man With The Violin, written by Kathy Stinson – watch the trailer/interview below.

EDEED7C1-FE45-401E-9838-1A2D49BD55DCResources/Activities: Research your family tree by asking relatives for help; ask relatives for favorite stories about family members.

CC8A9FCB-9AA0-473E-8C49-EFB23A70EEBFFor more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

PPBF: The Mediterranean

79225BCA-E2F4-4E87-918F-85444F57B380Author/Illustrator: Armin Greder
Publisher: Allen & Unwin, 2017, originally publ. in Italy
Age: 8+
Themes: refugees, shipwrecks, Mediterranean region
Opening: After he had finished drowning, his body sank slowly to the bottom, where the fish were waiting.

BE720432-243B-4E89-94B9-B68D37B4226ESummary: (from my library’s catalog) A lifeless body. One of many in the waters of the Mediterranean. Precarious boats navigate the waters of the sea, from south to north. And more often than not, it is not only hope that drowns. The author and illustrator uses his distinctive charcoal drawings to depict a dark world with a global dimension. The only words in the story are a single sentence indicating what is happening to the body in the water in the first picture. From there on the reader needs to examine the pictures to draw conclusions about how that body came to be in the sea. An afterword by Alessandro Leogrande, an Italian journalist who writes about social, political and environmental issues, fills in thebackground about the ‘food chain’ portrayed in this disturbing picture book which demands discussion.

F540E815-8E99-4787-A5C5-2786C5340836I like this book because: It is so powerful! Migration has always been an important issue, but especially now in it’s forced impact, and of our time on earth, and, I believe, one we will have to deal with on a myriad of levels and layers all over the world at least for the rest of my lifetime. And a wordless picture book may be the perfect vehicle for discussion. The execution makes the very best use of strong yet simple composition and contrast, limited palette, and loose rendering to deliver equally on an emotional and thought-provoking level. Pow!

6EEC960E-95FF-44A9-9726-4F170A97F644Resources/Activities: Make this a weekly discussion, where new ideas and thoughts may be brought up to ponder over and over.

3D934AD2-FE41-4445-A713-393EEA208A68For more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

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PPBF: There’s A Hippopotamus On Our Roof Eating Cake

57B99CA0-CDBC-43FA-B9C2-A66FB9F4B201Author: Hazel Edwards
Illustrator:
Deborah Niland
Publisher:
Holiday House, 1980
Age: 
4-8
Themes: hippos, imagination, humorous stories
OpeningOur roof leaks. Drip! Drip! Drip!

B356756B-EE32-4B50-81EB-5D76CA7A6157Summary: (from my library catalog) The hippopotamus who lives on the roof is able to do all the things the little girl who lives below isn’t allowed to do.

70BCCCF1-568A-4493-AB8A-873950AEBE68I like this book because: Simple, funny, and it’s based on a true story. Ha! Well, it’s true to our main character. And while we never find out what her name is, we surely know her! The bold yet spare palette capture the reader’s focused attention and get right to the point with very few lines. Hope you can find this ol’ gem!

EEC01D8C-EE0E-4347-A0CB-F61A5A7B8220Resources/Activities: write and illustrate your own stories based on what may be the reason for household problems and quirks. What makes the floors creak? Why won’t the toilet stop running? What goes bump in the night? Was that a squirrel or a branch or…?

4DA6199D-548F-40EB-A7BA-840E0C790E08For more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

 

PPBF: Tickle My Ears

2C06F27B-7495-486D-8881-84FE7832F83DAuthor/Illustrator: Jörg Mühle
Publisher: Gecko Press, 2016, originally publ. in German
Age: 1-5
Themes: bedtime, rabbits, inter-active stories
Opening: This is little rabbit. Tap him on the shoulder – will he turn around?

ABB1F0FF-B3A6-4BD5-801B-6AF8F64AA614Summary: (from my library’s catalog) Encourages readers to interact with the story by helping a little rabbit go through the steps of getting ready for bed.

7BF2CD73-031C-4027-B67F-4E5FA4BE5903I like this book because: I read it with my storytime gang not knowing how it would turn out having to share interaction with a board book with up to 10 kids! It went over splendidly, though  I opted out of having them each kiss the character good night! They loved it – even the 6 yr old joined in on the fun! A simple, adorable tickle of a book!

FC5A73E4-8F36-4B69-9E87-F6D37692278AResources/Activities: We read Big Bad Bunny/Billingsley and Karas, another bedtime book albeit with a slightly scary (Rrrar!) intro!; make hand- or potato-print pillowcases; staple together  a ‘sleeping bag’ from a strip of felt for a favorite stuffed animal or figurine or even a paper cut-out animal character. For more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

9CC126C2-FB40-44F3-A9D1-0A8B4DD250CA

PPBF: Danny McGee Drinks the Sea

DannyMcGeecover.jpgAuthor: Andy Stanton
Illustrator: 
Neal Layton
Publisher: 
Schwartz & Wade2016 (Orig publ. by Hodder Children’s Books, 2016)
Age: 
4-8
Themes: siblings, humorous stories, stories in rhyme
OpeningOne summer’s day, Danny and Frannie McGee hopped into a car and drove down to the sea.

DannyMcGee1Summary: (from my library catalog) When Danny’s sister doubts his boast that he can drink the entire sea, he not only proves he was right, he swallows everything else in sight.

DannyMcGee1bI like this book because: The humor and read-aloud-ability are the super-powers of this book. I really want to share it with my storytime crew, and though I wonder if the youngest might not catch some of the humor, it might just be worth trying! And summer is almost over – good time for us land-locked-lubbers! The illustrations are fun, bright and energetic, but in a few spots some interesting details are too close to the gutter – sorry I noticed at all, but hey, I notice stuff!

DannyMcGee2Resources/Activities: Read companion stories that have to do with eating, like I Know an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Pie/Jackson and Schachner, The Runaway Dinner/ Ahlberg and Ingman, Stop That Pickle!/ Armour and Shachat;discuss your favorite foods and how much could be eaten in one sitting; have a mini watermelon eating contest (not as harmful as hotdogs!)

DannyMcGee3For more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

DannyMcGeeback

PPBF: The Other Ducks

9FE2F4A8-1EC6-4499-A03D-371E95465AF8Author: Ellen Yeomans
Illustrator: 
Chris Sheban
Publisher: 
Neal Porter/Roaring Brook Press2018
Age: 
4-7
Themes: ducks, humorous stories
OpeningThis Duck and That Duck were the best of friends.

FB319BF0-353A-479A-9644-5A9824116709Summary: (from my library catalog) This Duck and That Duck get along swimmingly. But sometimes two ducks just aren’t enough. especially when you want to waddle in a line. On a bright sunny day, This Duck and That Duck gaze into the clear water of their pond and discover, to their surprise and delight… The Other Ducks. But what happens when the days turn cloudy and gray?

D512E208-36D7-4444-957C-58BD8CB7226DI like this book because: IT’S GORGEOUS! The characters are adorable – but the mood! The soft light of a summer sun low in the sky on a hazy day makes me feel that humid summer days of yore were not all that bad (so easy to imagine from a spot in the semi-desert!) And it’s so funny! The humor builds steadily and by the end I had laughed heartily, out loud, all by myself! I think I want to take this book everywhere I go! Fingers crossed that my 4yr old neighbor comes over very soon.

18A07340-2612-4486-B948-024FD5276AE7Resources/Activities: Visit a pond of course, and look for other ducks! Learn the difference between a diving duck and a dabbler; Take a series of photos with a rubber duck slightly hidden, in your house and/or your garden, and share them with friends who like to find objects hidden in pictures; Read other books about ducks: Make Way for Ducklings/Robert McCloskey, Death, Duck and the Tulip/Wolf Erlbruch, The Ugly Duckling/H.C.Andersen, The Story About Ping/Marjorie Flack; watch this video about ducks for the very young.

2DE826DC-FA45-40A1-9829-126AE259A3D4For more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

PPBF: All Are Welcome

IMG-4406Author: Alexandra Penfold
Illustrator: 
Suzanne Kaufmann
Publisher:
Knopf Books2018
Age:
4-8
Themes: diversity, inclusivity, kindness
Opening: Pencil’s sharpened in their case. Bells are ringing, let’s make haste. School’s beginning, dreams to chase. All are welcome here.

IMG-4409Summary: (from the publisher) Follow a group of children through a day in their school, where everyone is welcomed with open arms. A school where kids in patkas, hijabs, and yarmulkes play side by side with friends in baseball caps. A school where students grow and learn from each other’s traditions and the whole community gathers to celebrate the Lunar New Year. Inspired by Suzanne Kaufman’s viral poster, Kaufman and Alexandra Penfold have created a welcoming picture book that celebrates diversity and gives encouragement and support to all kids.

IMG-4407I like this book because: it celebrates the diversity of the American journey in a familiar setting for children. Many lines like, “Gather now, lets all take part,” show how, as a whole diversity is greater than it’s parts. The vibrant illustrations invite every reader to find themselves in image and in action (esp. love the main character’s tooth gap, just like my daughter’s!). And, as the cover reveals, there is a wonderful poster included in the jacket – the sensation that brought about the collaboration for this classroom treasure!

IMG-4408Resources/Activities: celebrate diversity in your classroom with food, discuss holidays and customs, and compare family values; how are we all different, how are we the same? Read companion books, like The Journey/Francesca Sanna, Migrant/Maxine Trotier and Isabelle Arsenault, or Jalapeño Bagels/Natasha Wing and Robert Casilla; make a school cookbook – like the well-loved one below; my daughter contributed the recipe from Germany, where she was born, pictured further down, which we would serve for any meal – just make sure you fry those potatoes to crispy goodness!

IMG-4412.jpg

IMG-4413.jpgFor more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

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PPBF: Baabwaa and Wooliam

613D8E24-C27E-4BA4-B08B-20809849FD25Author: David Elliott
Illustrator: Melissa Sweet
Publisher: Candlewick, 2018
Age: 4-8
Themes: sheep, wolves, reading, knitting

593745FA-8F00-4D57-8EAA-DB9DCDB0EB72Opening: This is Wooliam. He is a sheep. You will note that Wooliam is reading. There are not many sheep who read. But Wooliam is one of them.

92119E42-52B6-47F4-B93C-70532F2BF02DSummary: (from the publisher): Baabwaa is a sheep who loves to knit. Wooliam is a sheep who loves to read. It sounds a bit boring, but they like it. Then, quite unexpectedly, a third sheep shows up. A funny-looking sheep who wears a tattered wool coat and has long, dreadfully decaying teeth. Wooliam, being well-read, recognizes their new acquaintance: the Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing! The wolf is so flattered to discover his literary reputation precedes him that he stops trying to eat Baabwaa and Wooliam. And a discovery by the sheep turns the encounter into an unexpected friendship.

8936AC7D-D8DE-45FC-9161-63D2A61E358AI like this book because:The whimsical watercolor-collages are cheerful and satisfying, as I always note them to be in Melissa Sweet’s books, but this time I am especially enjoying the character designs. I want to camp out with these three! But the storytelling! Ahh! It’s the sort I might call cheeky if I new exactly how the British apply the word. In any case it takes me back to stories I’ve read to my children just before they started reading early chapter books on their own, where they had more patience and could soak up all the goodness of a well-layered sense of humor. Have I sold you yet?

8E1409D8-30B4-4EB3-8A4F-246D98B9FFBFResources/Activities: read a book, learn to knit a scarf (check out THIS video), then head out on an adventure – birdsong included. Pack a lunch to take along, unless you like eating grass; make a map of where you’ve been, like the one on page 8; read multiple wolf-themed books so you too can recognize one when you see it! Make a sheep craft, like the one below – more info HERE.

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For more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

PPBF: Shake the Tree!

64DD3A62-9B73-4C6F-9D71-AA4C1515594FAuthors/Illustrator: Chiara Vignocchi, Paolo Chiarinotti, and Silvia Borando
Publisher: Candlewick, 2018; Orig. by minibombo, Italy, 2015; Engl. translation, Walker Books 2018
Age: 2-7
Themes: trees, animals, nuts
Opening: Mouse spots a nut. “Mmm,” she says. “I’m going to gobble that up!”

148CEFB8-89CE-4B15-829D-D472DBE8D702Summary: (from my library’s catalog) After shaking a tree to retrieve a tasty looking nut, mouse is suprised when something else falls out of the tree.

EDFB46B3-B75C-4B77-9A6C-3D4A560536B4I like this book because: I took a crazy chance and read it to my storytime gang without having read the whole book ahead of time. Why? I don’t know. You’d think I would have learned my lesson from a couple of derailing blunders! But I am so happy I did! There is a special level of excitement and energy to be had when you discover a good book together. The story is as simple as the illustrations, and so easy for each child to grasp: those not yet completing full sentences and those reading the words along with me. I won’t spoil the fun with too many images or any more details. Please find this and share it with a child you love!

DF6152C4-087B-42F5-B801-9A59D89E2BCCResources/Activities: play Topfschlagen, a game I learned at parties when we lived in Germany, where a blindfolded player must tap with a wooden spoon to find an upside-down pot with a reward (a nut!). The other children can help out by giving hot/cold clues for direction. I only asked the youngest to close their eyes, and of course they did not, but we had such fun anyway!

953AB8C1-3545-4E5E-B1CE-AD30028B4CF1For more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.