PPBF: I Do Not Like Books Anymore!

CD43691B-C78F-46F6-B61A-1B36280C5716Author/Illustrator: Daisy Horst
Publisher: Candlewick Press, 2018
Age: 3-7
Themes: siblings, reading, books
Opening: Natalie and Alphonse really liked books and stories.

4621BE25-012C-4A13-A5DF-D09C60149840Summary: (from my library’s catalog/amazon) Natalie and Alphonse REALLY like books. So when it’s time for Natalie to learn to read, she thinks it will be exciting — she can have all the stories in the world now, and even read them to Alphonse. But when Natalie gets her first reading book, the letters look like squiggles and it isn’t even a good story; it’s just about a cat that can sit. “I do not like books anymore!” Natalie declares. But she still wants to make up stories. With Alphonse’s help, can she find a way to turn a love of telling stories into a love of reading stories?

07A3DCBC-3C89-446A-8657-C32B8C537884I like this book because: It’s an adorable take on the trials and tribulations of learning to read. For my daughter it was such a chore, and for my son the words danced on the page, so I can easily see how reader’s will identify with Natalie’s plight. The illustrations are cute yet not too sweet and very easy for picture readers!

FA1C9E18-8CF0-4809-8A7E-5EF2F950721BResources/Activities: make a story with pictures and have a reading writer help put down the words, just like the siblings did in this book; create your own stories using toys of your own; make a display for your favorite book, using props, drawings, even food!

8E563E15-FA86-418C-BD82-AA245FC51C5BFor more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE

PPBF: Steadfast Tin Soldier

BF4E6FA6-4C03-493F-B876-7639EF42B552Author: Hans Christian Andersen/Joohee Yoon
Illustrator: 
Joohee Yoon
Publisher:
Enchanted Lion Books, 2016
Age: 4
-8
Themes: Toys, fairytales
OpeningOnce there were five and twenty tin soldiers, all of them brothers, being made from the same tin spoon.

40DC6820-6B08-4358-AD9C-58B4394C3A66Summary: (from my library catalog) The perilous adventure of a toy soldier who loves a paper dancing girl culminates in tragedy for both of them.

50418E2F-E08A-4019-BA19-EFC8A307EE0CI like this book because: I love fairytales, especially around the holidays – nostalgia? – and this is such a beautiful version! The text is also more palatable for younger ears, but together with the illustrations this is a book that multiple ages can enjoy together.

F61D2F46-EC28-46A3-8466-4601A17ACBD0Resources/Activities: create art using just two colors, or one color and black; read more fairytales together! I find that winter-break was always a good time to bake, read, drink tea or hot cocoa, and just enjoy being together.

F18CF510-F6D6-44C1-B511-02C4BA7FDDF4For more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE

A17B5289-630C-4DCB-BCAF-19C4592BE6C4

PPBF: Night Job

91DC9551-5692-4504-AE10-28E45D850209Author: Karen Hesse
Illustrator: 
G. Brian Karas
Publisher:
Candlewick Press, 2018
Age: 4
-8
Themes: Fathers and sons, night work , nighttime
OpeningOn Friday nights, when the sun goes down, I snap the clips shut on Dad’s lunchbox and climb onto the back of his bike.

E0BD83FF-F2F4-4723-BD75-3CB02BC10306Summary: (from my library catalog) What is it like to work at night, while the rest of the city is asleep? Newbery Medalist Karen Hesse’s quietly powerful story of a boy and his father is tenderly brought to life by G. Brian Karas in this luminous tribute to an enduring, everyday sort of love.

91F16415-2941-4F24-A6C0-AFBB08082591I like this book because: employment is a part of life that each family deals with differently and yet is seldom discussed. In Night Job the images are evocative of what can make the night seem almost dream-like and magical, and the writing Is equally transportive – it would be a neat idea to read this a second time around with the listener’s eyes closed!

DBCCB011-55DB-4441-BF2B-1EB7DCB854B2Resources/Activities: talk about jobs, regular hours, night shifts, and different forms of employment; discuss the pros and cons of these different forms; what do kids in school think of their ‘jobs’ as students, the hours, and ‘time off’?

E9FB38EC-A921-42D8-9965-A768C6E747AEFor more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE

PPBF: 13 Words

34BFFD2A-2060-4CA2-9E5D-B1D4188226A0Author: Daniel Handler
Illustrator: 
Maira Kalman
Publisher:
Harper Collins, 2010
Age: 5-8

Themes: birds, dogs, words
Opening: Word number 1: Bird. The bird sits on the table.

33FAFDAA-A498-43E1-B31E-BD948894BDEBSummary: (from my library catalog) A dog attempts to cheer up his friend, a despondent bird, in a tale that introduces a series of words from “baby” to “haberdashery.”

9E34F3C9-5792-43F2-993C-5F0455B096FFI like this book because: It was introduced to me by an enthusiastic 6yr old! The pictures are bright, funny and engaging, the concept is simple, the story silly and playful, and invites readers to play with words too!

6AC56B5B-7E43-40A6-BDD4-561B57B71D66Resources/Activities: write short stories based off your own set of 13 words, maybe have the words chosen out of a hat; try writing a story based off of 2 characters, one object, one location/setting and a happy of sad ending; draw at least one illustration based off of the stories.

1A444FF3-9FCB-406D-8CE8-CABE65AB956EFor more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

PPBF: Do Not Open

665553D9-D668-49FC-ABAF-68AF614A75E9Author/Illustrator: Brinton Turkle
Publisher: Penguin, 1981
Age: 4-8
Themes: cats, seashore, magic
Opening: Miss Moody lived at land’s end with Captain Kidd. Captain Kidd wasn’t the famous pirate; he was a cat.

262F8ADD-9EB8-412E-85B5-BF026A2B4163Summary: (from my library’s catalog) Following a storm Miss Moody and her cat find an intriguing bottle washed up on the beach. Should they ignore its “Do not open” warning?

300DC470-5B1F-4F67-8082-663099AD57A3I like this book because: Drawn to the illustrations on a another one of Jama Kim Rattigan’s facebook posts, I placed several of Brinton Turkle’s books on hold, and this is one I had enjoyed before with my children. It’s a His use of dramatic pencil lines and efficient yet bold compositions is food for my soul! (I would have preferred not to have the text boxes set in the middle of these lovely images though!) It’s a dramatic little story too!

8FB4948D-1FF9-486C-9B43-061FC3B2C19EResources/Activities: Brinton Turkle’s started making picture books before I was born, and one title, Thy Friend, Obadiah, won a Caldecott Honor Medal in 1970. Look for a pile of his books, ones he wrote and ones he illustrated for others, and enjoy!

DB8CD5D4-F72D-47DF-81ED-20CACF89A89DFor more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE

PPBF: The Wall In the Middle of the Book

F895AFF1-C2AA-417B-95C4-3E83C0AB704DAuthor/Illustrator: Jon Agee
Publisher: Dial, 2018
Age: 3-7
Themes: knights, assumptions, walls
Opening: There’s a wall in the middle of the book. And it’s a good thing.

8ABDCC0D-6276-467D-B049-1ADE82212B28Summary: (from my library’s catalog) A knight who feels secure on his side of the wall that divides his book discovers that his side is not as safe as he thought, and the other side is not as threatening.

932C98E5-5437-4D42-992E-43F69838A7C1I like this book because: I live for picture books with humor so dry, concepts so simple, yet all brought together elegantly! And when the function of text and pictures can only work together, just as the maker intended, well, the stars shine brighter, don’t they?

73887F17-2A61-4FF3-AB11-F34983B06D5AResources/Activities: once you’ve read the book together a few times (because you’ll want to) discuss each spread and all the elements present that help deliver the picture book maker’s intentions; act the whole thing out as a play; imagine what happens after the last page.

CB959A92-B952-4D78-9100-69359798F65BFor more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE

 

PPBF: Penguinaut!

D7D3E475-0EB7-4C28-B11F-9BB049AAC583Author: Marcie Collen
Illustrator: 
Emma Yarlett
Publisher:
Orchard, 2018
Age:
3-7
Themes: penguins, zoo, moon
OpeningOrville was small. His friends were big. And their adventures were bigger

073BC828-75E1-495C-9443-F1BC7BF6EDC9Summary: (from my library catalog) Orville is a little penguin who lives in a zoo and dreams of big adventures, like going to the Moon; the other animals are skeptical, but Orville is determined, so he builds a spaceship and sets out all by himself–and discovers that real adventures are best when they are shared with friends.

34B1586C-2709-43B4-8741-F19801D94552I like this book because: full disclosure: I am biased! This is a BA-BOING brand new picture book from one of my critique partners, and it IS fabulous! Great rhythm and readaloudablity, oodles of onomatopoeia and lots of alliteration! AND I love the mixed media illustrations and adorable KA-BOOM character designs! BLAST OFF to your library and enjoy it yourself!

Nightsky kid's artResources/Activities: create your own milk-carton rockets; make a volcano-styled blast-off with recyclable water bottles, instructions HERE; make night sky art on dark paper, like the one above which I found HERE

EE4BCBB8-FF0D-449E-95E7-8DB218F46B2CFor more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE.

PPBF: The Bear & the Fly

78294F3D-7136-4FBD-AD20-0A65CF670014Author/Illustrator: Paula Winter
Publisher: Crown Publishers, 1976
Age: 4-7
Themes: bears, disaster, wordless picturebook

7B725FE6-CEA8-4285-B45D-CA56E962C41FSummary: (from my library’s catalog) A bear tries to catch a fly with disastrous results.

I like this book because: It’s a book we would likely not see published today, which is a shame. Kids understand how one family member’s distractions, weaknesses, and faults affect the whole family and may well be able to identify, and also see the foolishness and humor in obsessions. The illustration style is still highly attractive and effective today. I also love the handy size: 5.5”x7”

F70ABB44-65CB-4141-8FAB-C529D139EA8CResources/Activities: Study wordless picturebooks; how do artists what to draw to move a story forwards and create a page turner without text?; consider other solutions for this family – how could this story have ended differently? Watch the video at the bottom of the post.

99977D81-A3AD-4530-A5F5-79F5849BEE46

 

PPBF: The Teeny-Tiny Woman

B6820DF0-0D0C-44BE-AED7-02ECDB326454Author/Illustrator: Paul Galdone
Publisher: Houghtoin Mifflin, 1984
Age: 4-7
Themes: folklore, bones, scary stories
Opening: Once upon a time there was a teeny-tiny woman who lived in a teeny-tiny house in a teeny-tiny village.

73D84345-E247-4653-80CC-0D54882D02E4Summary: (from my library’s catalog) Retells the tale of the teeny-tiny woman who finds a teeny-tiny bone in a churchyard and puts it away in her cupboard before she goes to sleep.

3CB0CE98-617F-4460-AA52-4CDF12E3B4B2I like this book because: It’s a teeny-tiny classic, a re-telling of a folktale that has just the right amount of silly in just the right amount of spooky for not so teeny-tiny kids! The illustrations are cute but not too cute too! And it’s so much fun to read aloud – a priority for me!

2B1B158D-6EBB-4D30-8FA5-8DF57652FCE2Resources/Activities: read this at Halloween or at a sleep-over, or on a dark, rainy afternoon; along with other slightly scary titles like A Creepy Pair Of Underwear/A.Reynolds and P.Brown, Big Bad Bunny/Franny Billingsley and G.Brian Karas

5A83BB81-78B9-4E29-B1D4-57E9CC196556For more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE

88F27848-E8C3-4908-B52E-B29268090F82

PPBF: Who Needs Donuts?

108F05E3-5EB9-4A47-8609-C28BFF743312Author/Illustrator: Mark Alan Stamaty
Publisher: Alfred A. Knopf, 1973
Age: 4+
Themes: obsession, donuts, love
Opening: Sam lived with his family in a nice house. He had a big yard and lots of friends.

6CC0A80E-017C-436A-9AD1-DE9D2A36E916Summary: (from my library’s catalog) Young Sam leaves home to satisfy his craving for donuts, finds a job with a donut collector, and discovers the answer to the question “Who needs donuts when you got love?”

AD0A64BA-F2E3-442D-A67E-C9D063E8E86CI like this book because: It’s a classic gem of a quirky picture book, and apparently loved by many, as it was the search for copies that lead the publisher to renew true copyright and reprint the book nearly 30 years later. A book for a road trip, for sure, as there is so much to discover on every inch of every page! Crazy-silly story that against all odds is completely satisfying! Do look for it!

39FD64D1-3092-4F46-85B2-CD3E89B8BB48Resources/Activities: (assign small groups to) count the numbers of animals, cars, people, donuts, shoes, any technicals impossibilities, etc.; draw your own city scenes with  made up street signs; take this with you on a road trip

4E746C88-7595-4A63-AA82-4098632A2EC2

Just thought the label goes with the book, innit?

For more Perfect Picture Book Friday picks with teacher/parent resources, check out the list on Susanna Hill’s blog HERE

04617412-8F6F-4126-B6B7-603AB762E4F9